Class Notes (838,019)
United States (325,254)
BSCI 106 (116)
all (36)
Lecture

Lecture Note Ecology and Evolution on Islands

4 Pages
73 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biological Sciences Program
Course
BSCI 106
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Ecology and Evolution on Islands 11/28/2012 Species­area Relationships Species richness increases with area True for both continents and islands However, islands have smaller numbers of species than equal areas on mainland Species diversity patterns on islands Longtime area of interest in ecology and evolution Used to explain diversity on mainland as well as on islands Habitat islands Both oceanic islands and habitat islands follow the same rules Embedded in “sea” of unlike habitat Habitat islands have different species than surroundings What determines number of species on an island? Distance Lowers rate of colonization Remote islands have fewer species than nearby islands  Few North American birds in Hawaii  If distance affects colonization, then differential dispersal ability should affect likelihood of  different species on an island Few mammals from Northern Australia found in New Guinea, but many birds are Due to limited size and habitat types, resources may limit number of species on an island  Therefore, # of existing species may affect rates of extinction through competitive exclusion  Island species richness will vary as a function of island characteristics # of existing species  Island size  Island distance from a source of species  2  Ecology and Evolution on Islands Theory of Island Biogeography MacArthur and Wilson hypothesized that the number of species present on an island is a product  of just two processes: Rates of Immigration Rates of Extinction Immigration is proportional to island distance from mainland Poor and good dispersers can colonize nearby islands Only good dispersers can colonize a far island Small islands have fewer resources, less habitat heterogeneity than large islands Cannot support large populations Small populations have higher probability of extinction Competition increases as the number of species increases Competitive exclusion occurs more rapidly  on smaller islands “Equilibrium” species richness   When immigration rate = extinction rate   Individual species still changes Rate of immigration is not controlled by  size, it’s controlled by  distance Island species richness is a function of distance and size E
More Less

Related notes for BSCI 106

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit