Class Notes (836,147)
United States (324,358)
BSCI 106 (116)
all (36)
Lecture

Lecture Notes Biogeochemical Cycles

4 Pages
105 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biological Sciences Program
Course
BSCI 106
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Biogeochemical Cycles 11/30/2012 Biological and geochemical processes cycle nutrients and water in ecosystems Life and ecosystem productivity depend on recycling chemical elements Gaseous C, O, S, and N occur in the atmosphere and cycle globally Less mobile elements include P, K, and Ca These elements cycle locally in terrestrial systems but more broadly when dissolved in aquatic  systems Nutrient cycling includes reservoirs and transfers  between reservoirs Four important facets of nutrient cycles Each chemical’s biological importance Forms in which each chemical is available or used by  organisms Major reservoirs for each chemical Key processes driving movement of each chemical through its cycle Types of reservoirs The Water Cycle More a physical process than a chemical one Driven by evaporation and wind Affected by substrate and vegetation properties Liquid water is primary physical phase in which water is used Oceans contain 97% of biosphere’s water, 2% in glaciers and polar ice caps, 1% in lakes, rivers,  groundwater Vegetative cover and substrate will determine percolation and runoff The Carbon Cycle Global C cycle involves movement of C among terrestrial ecosystems, oceans, and atmospheres Ocean is largest of these 3 reservoirs 2  Biogeochemical Cycles C movies into and out of atmospheric reservoir rapidly via photosynthesis and respiration Other major pools (g) Fossil fuels Rock (limestone) Major fluxes (not well understood) The Nitrogen cycle + – N 2in atmosphere is unavailable because plants use ammonium (NH ) or nitrate 4NO ) 3 N added to ecosystems in usable form only when fixed—converted from N  to NH 2 3 Nitrogen fixation results from lightning­driven reactions in the atmosphere Enzyme­catalyzed reactions in bacteria that live in soil and oceans Nitrogen fixation The direct production of nitrogen fixation is ammonia (NH ) 3 Highly energetic process + + Ammonia picks up H  and becomes ammonium, NH  in the soil (a4monification) + ­ Plants can use NH  or4NO 3 Bacteria play essential roles in N cycle Certain aerobic bacteria oxidize NH , a p4ocess called nitrification Some bacteria convert nitrate to N , wh2ch goes back into the atmosphere (denitrification) Humans have drastically altered natural N c
More Less

Related notes for BSCI 106

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit