Class Notes (836,580)
United States (324,591)
BSCI 106 (116)
all (36)
Lecture

Lecture Notes Disease as an Evolutionary Force

7 Pages
43 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biological Sciences Program
Course
BSCI 106
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Disease as an Evolutionary Force 11/27/2012 Coevolution Host and pathogen evolve together, each in response to selection imposed by the other European rabbits introduced into Australia in 1859 Rabbit population exploded ­ cattle and sheep pastureland threatened  Control methods failed Rabbit proof fence  1950, Myxoma virus introduced – transmitted by mosquitoes 99.8% of infected rabbits died Over time, rabbits evolved resistance Virus became less lethal Gene­for­gene interactions Particular host genotypes resistant to particular pathogen genotypes Wheat has dozens of different genes for resistance to fungal wheat rusts Mutations occur in wheat rusts that produce new genotypes to which wheat is not resistant  Frequencies of wheat rust genotypes vary considerably over time as farmers use different  resistant varieties of wheat  Change in frequencies of host and parasite genotypes Parasitic trematode worm and host snail in 3 New Zealand lakes Trematode causes sterility in snails Disease as an Evolutionary Force 2 Trematode parasite has a shorter generation time than the snail Local differentiation ­ parasites infected snails from their home lake more effectively than they  infected snails from the other 2 lakes  Snails genotypes also changed in response to parasites Most abundant snail genotype changed from year to year  The year after a genotype was most abundant, that genotype had higher number of parasites Common genotypes are attacked by many parasites, placing them at a disadvantage and driving  down their numbers in future years Most organisms reproduce through outcrossing, even though it comes with substantial costs Sexually reproducing parent transmits only 50% of their genes compared to 100% for an  asexually reproducing parent – cost of meiosis  Costs of finding and competing for a mate  Costs of males – can’t bear young For each male, one less female in population  Red Queen hypothesis – selection from coevolving pathogens facilitates persistence of  outcrossing despite costs Recent experimental test Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and bacterial pathogen Serratia marcescens Populations of C. elegans are composed of males and hermaphrodites Hermaphrodites reproduce through either self­fertilization or by outcrossing with males  Disease as an Evolutionary Force 3 Outcrossing can be genetically manipulated to produce either obligately selfing or obligately  outcrossing populations.  Pathogen, S. marcescens, is highly virulent – a systemic infection kills host within 24 hours Three different parasite treatments Control (no exposure to S. marcescens)  Evolution (repeated exposure to a fixed, non­evolving strain of S. marcescens)  Coevolution – repeated exposure (30 generations) to a potentially coevolving population of S.  marcescens (selection for increased infectivity)  All obligately selfing populations extinct within 20 generations with coevolving pathogens No obligately selfing populations went extinct in either evolution treatment or control treatment  All obligately outcrossing and wild­type populations persisted throughout experiment in all  treatments  Coevolutionary dynamics Hosts evolved under coevolution compared to ancestral populations (before coevolution) in  response to 3 different pathogen types Ancestor strain A non­coevolving strain A coevolving strain (coevolved with host) 3 Types Obligately selfing Populations survived less than 20 generations  Disease as an Evolutionary Force 4 Lowest mortality with ancestral pathogens  Highest mortality with coevolving pathogen  No evidence of coevolution – in fact later generations did worse than ancestors  Wildtype Highest mortality in ancestral populations exposed to coevolved pathogen  Evidence of higher resistance in later generations, coevolved populations  Obligately outcrossing Lowest mortality rates compared to other mating types  Ancestral populations more susceptible to coevolved pathogen  Evidence of increased resistance in later generations, even with coevolved pathogen Red 
More Less

Related notes for BSCI 106

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit