Class Notes (834,936)
United States (323,974)
BSCI 106 (116)
all (36)
Lecture

Lecture Notes The Origin of Life

6 Pages
82 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biological Sciences Program
Course
BSCI 106
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
The Origin of Life 10/31/2012 Origin of life – three problems We can’t observe the earliest steps Test plausibility of steps Even the simplest life forms are complex Replication and metabolism – what came first? DNA – stable, great for information storage, little else Proteins – catalysts, require information for DNA to be assembled RNA – more reactive than DNA, can be a catalyst and a storage template Earliest history of life Earth forms about 4.5 billion years ago Inhospitable until about 3.9 billion years ago Signs of lie appear quickly 3.85 billion years ago Life­like carbon isotopes Definitive prokaryotic fossils by 3.5 billion years ago Environment very different Volcanoes Lightning, ultraviolet sunlight provided energy sources stronger than today Meteor impacts 2  The Origin of Life Very little oxygen to oxidize molecules Reducing atmosphere Four big steps to life Formation of small organic  compounds Amino acids, sugars, formaldehyde, hydrogen, cyanide, etc. Oparin and Haldane theory Early atmosphere had little oxygen Early atmosphere was reducing (lots of CH , N4 , H 3 2 This favored reactions forming organic molecules Energy sources to drive chemical reactions were readily available on early Earth Lightning and intense UV radiation that penetrated thinner, primitive atmosphere Young stars emit more UV radiation and early earth lacked an ozone layer Experiment – Miller and Urey Created a reducing atmosphere, spark Results Formed many organic compounds, including amino acids Other experiments have made all the amino acids used by life Problems Early atmosphere probably not as conducive as they made it Probably had lots of CO ,2N ,2perhaps more O 2 The Origin of Life 3 Instead of forming in the atmosphere, the first organic compounds may have been synthesized  near volcanoes or deep­sea vents From elsewhere – asteroids have lots of organic material (amino acids) Asteroids have lots of organic material E.g. amino acids Early Earth was bombarded with meteors Murchison meteorite in Australia had 80 amino acids, lipids and uracil Formation of complex polymers Possible without cellular catalysts? Yes Need to concentrate monomers E.g. by drying Need t catalyze reaction inorganically Many inorganics can o this (e.g. clays) Not a huge obstacle Has been done experimentally Polymers, including polypeptides, have been formed by dripping solutions of monomers onto hot  sand, clay, or rock Similar conditions likely existed on early Earth when dilute solutions of monomers splashed onto  fresh lava or at deep­sea vents Sugars and purines have been made Major debates about where these processes occurred Shallow water, moist sediments or clay pore spaces Deep­sea thermal vents Ancestors of modern prokaryotes lived in hot conditions and metabolized inorganic sulfur  compounds  4  The Origin of Life Deep sea thermal vents have energy sources, produce organic compounds, and have inorganic  iron and nickel sulfides that can catalyze some organic reactions  Formation of “protobionts” (cells) to protect complex polymers (a
More Less

Related notes for BSCI 106

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit