Class Notes (904,880)
US (350,301)
UMD (6,096)
SOCY (150)
SOCY 200 (34)
J.Pease (16)
Lecture

Nanook Notes

3 Pages
67 Views

Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCY 200
Professor
J.Pease

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
______________________________________________________________
1
THE SOCHE BUFF'S GAZETTE
Professors Noh et al.___________________________________________2¢
NANOOK
"Nanook of the North." This film was made on Baffin Island in the Arctic Ocean
between Canada and Greenland. It premiered 1922. This film was the creation of Robert
Flaherty, an American who lived among the Inuit for several years. It is generally regarded as
the first social documentary film. When the National Archives began archiving classic
American films, "Nanook of the North" was one of the first archived.
Although this film was staged, it is an accurate portrayal of the traditional way of life
of the Inuit. Flaherty organized the film to show a year in the life of the Inuit and how they
come to terms with their biophysical environment. The film depicts the daily life of an Inuit
family. The focus of the film is Nanook (played by Alakkariallak). He has two wives (Nyla and
Cunayou) and four children (Allee and Allegoo and two babies). The film shows a trek to the
trading post, fishing for salmon, a walrus hunt, searching for food, uncovering a fox Nanook
trapped deep in the snow, building an igloo, teaching a boy to use a bow and arrow, a spit bath,
sleeping in a common bed made of hard-packed snow covered with furs, spear fishing for a
huge seal, traveling in a bitter storm and finding shelter in a deserted igloo. Nanook died of
starvation in 1923.
As good as this film is, it doesn't teach us much about the life of women and completely
neglects the European exploitation and transformation of Inuit culture. There is nothing about
bear, whale, and caribou hunting.
There are tens of articles, one film, and several books about the making of this film and
the people involved. The 1974 feature film, "The White Dawn" (starring Lou Gossett, Jr. and
based on the novel of the same title), contains a number of scenes that ape ones in "Nanook of
the North." The 1959 feature film "The Innocent Savages" (starring Anthony Quinn and
featuring the screen debut of Peter O’Toole) is loosely based on The Top of the World by Hans
Ruesch. The 1996 film "Kabloonak" chronicles the making of "Nanook of the North."
A good book about the life of contemporary Inuit is The Fourth World by Sam Hall.
Many Inuit now use snowmobiles not dogsleds, guns not bows and arrows, welfare checks not
self-sufficient hunting and fishing. Most Inuit communities are troubled by high rates of
joblessness, suicide, and alcoholism.
[email protected] 10/31/2013

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
______________________________________________________________ 1 THE SOCHE BUFF'S GAZETTE Professors Noh et al.___________________________________________2¢ NANOOK "Nanook of the North." This film was made on Baffin Island in the Arctic Ocean between Canada and Greenland. It premiered 1922. This film was the creation of Robert Flaherty, an American who lived among the Inuit for several years. It is generally regarded as the first social documentary film. When the National Archives began archiving classic American films, "Nanook of the North" was one of the first archived. Although this film was staged, it is an accurate portrayal of the traditional way of life of the Inuit. Flaherty organized the film to show a year in the life of the Inuit and how they come to terms with their biophysical environment. The film depicts the daily life of an Inuit family. The focus of the film is Nanook (played by Alakkariallak). He has two wives (Nyla and Cunayou) and four children (Allee and Allegoo and two babies). The film shows a trek to the trading post, fishing for salmon, a walrus hunt, searching for food, uncovering a fox Nanook trapped deep in the snow, building an igloo, teaching a boy to use a bow and arrow, a spit bath, sleeping in a common bed made of hard-packed snow covered with furs, spear fishing for a huge seal, traveling in a bitter storm and finding shelter in a deserted igloo. Nanook died of starvation in 1923. As good as this film is, it doesn't teach us much about the life of women and completely neglects the European exploitation and transformation of Inuit culture. There is nothing about bear, whale, and caribou hunting. There are tens of articles, one film, and several books about the making of this film and the people involved. The 1974 feature film, "The White Dawn" (starring Lou Gossett, Jr. and based on the novel of the same title), contains a number of scenes that ape ones in "Nanook of the North." The 1959 feature film "The Innocent Savages" (starring Anthony Quinn and featuring the screen debut of Peter O’Toole) is loosely based on The Top of the World by Hans Ruesch. The 1996 film "Kabloonak" chronicles the making of "Nanook of the North." A good book about the life of contemporary Inuit is The Fourth World by Sam Hall. Many Inuit now use snowmobiles not dogsleds, guns not bows and arrows, welfare checks not self-sufficient hunting and fishing. Most Inuit communities are troubled by high rates of joblessness, suicide, and alcoholism. [email protected] 10/31/2013 I'd Rather Be Studying______________ ___________________________________________________________________ No Me The Inuit do not choose to use the word "somebody" instead of the word "me;" they don't have a word me. The words I, mine, me, myself do not exist in their language. Vocabularies of motive and identity reflect the society in which people live. Inuit are prevented by the material conditions in which they live from conceiving themselves in terms of privat
More Less
Unlock Document


Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit