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Lecture 26

PSY 101 Lecture Notes - Lecture 26: Pseudoscience, Homeopathy, Spontaneous RemissionPremium


Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSY 101
Professor
Christopher Niemiec
Lecture
26

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Session 15.4 - Other Approaches to Therapy
Group Therapy
Group therapy: therapies that treat more than one person at the same time
- Most common form = groups of 6-10 people, meet once or twice a week with a
therapist
- Can be found in schools, clinics, hospitals, churches, private practices
- Particularly effective for problems like depression, sexual abuse, eating disorders,
and PTSD
Benefits
- Cost: less expensive than individual therapy
- Social support: sharing time with people who experience similar troubles can
reduce feelings of isolation
- Social training skills: provides clients opportunity to learn/practice
communication/other social interaction skills
Family/Couples Therapy
- Focus more on what goes on between people than what is happening inside of an
individual
- System approaches often refer the idea that most people are part of a complex,
interrelated system of family relationships that contribute to and maintain
unhealthy behaviors
- Psychoeducation: the act of educating clients about their families about their
disorder
- Couples therapy/marriage counseling - relationship is focus of attention
Advantages
- Nearly everyone benefits in some way addressing the problem that brought them
there in the first place
Self-Help Groups
Self-help groups: voluntary, small groups that come together for mutual support and the
sharing of information
- Led by facilitator or run by members themselves
- Grief, eating disorders, substance abuse, other shared experiences
- Extremely popular in US
- AA is oldest/most popular self-help group (alcoholics anonymous)
o 12 step program
o effectiveness is quite high
Community Prevention
Idea of preventing disorder from occurring in first place is more appealing than having to
treat disorders after they emerge
- primary prevention: services aimed at reducing the incidence of mental health
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o focus on factors like unemployment, racism, sexism, violence and poverty
that place people at greater risk for psychological problems
- secondary prevention: services aimed at reducing the impact of mental illness
o example: crisis-intervention hotline set up for suicidal individuals
Community prevention program offered by shelters, faith centers, social service agencies
community-run clinics and may be privately or government funded
- may be concerned but untrained members of community or licensed professionals
- results have been positive - some suggesting they are more accessible and effective
than traditional treatments
Similar movement within field of community psychology toward evidence-based programs
(EBPs) that involve standardized interventions based on good quality scientific research
Alternative Therapies
Approaches include self-help books, internet therapy, herbal supplement and use of
expressive therapeutic techniques like art and music therapies, bibliotherapy, technology-
based treatments, and alternative medicine
Bibliotherapy
Bibliotherapy: the selection of reading material for a client that has relevance to that
person’s life situation
Self-help books: books written with the stated intention of instructing readers on how to
solve personal problems and improve their quality of life
- 95% of books have no basis in scientific research
- vary as to whether they involve scholarly research, pseudoscience, personal advice
or are written by a qualified, licensed therapist
Being an Informed Consumer of Self-Help Books
- avoid fast and easy fixes
- books shouldn’t replace therapy
- choose books with research
- select credible authors
therapist-recommended readings can be effective in treating many problems including
alcoholism, anxiety disorders, stress disorders, and depression
Technology-Based Therapies
- telecounseling, e-therapy, media counseling,
Telecounseling
Telecounseling: the use of telephone communication to provide mental health education
and services
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