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Lecture 5

CRM/LAW C7 Lecture Notes - Lecture 5: Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Bow Street Runners, Exclusionary Rule


Department
Criminology, Law and Society
Course Code
CRM/LAW C7
Professor
Valerie Jenness
Lecture
5

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10/30/2017
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
- Workings of police, with a focus on implicit bias and stereotype threat, factors
that influence arrest, and crime control and due process
- History of policing with a focus on specific milestones and eras
- Key issues in policing, cost, law enforcement and immigration, big data and
surveillance
- To describe, understand, debate following question: Is there a “crisis of
legitimacy in policing in the U.S.?”
- Discretion: the authority to choose between and among alternative courses of
action, based on individual judgment
DISCRETION IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM
- Police
- Enforce laws
- Investigate specific crimes
- Search people or buildings
- Arrest or detain people
- Prosecutors
- Judges
- Correctional officials
BLACKS, WHITES, AND THIN BLUE LINE: VIEWS OF RACE AND POLICE IN
AMERICA
- Whites and blacks tend to have different views of race and police
- Cultural chasm between the 2
- That divide has been on display since the deaths of Michael Brown & Eric Garner
- Some also have a pro-police mentality that sees blue first
- Blue = the uniform
GUEST LECTURER
Song Richardson, Professor of Law and Dean of Law School at UCI
- Study epidemic of police virus taking place across country → why?
- There can be racist police officers, but her research shows even if police officers
are egalitarian and act the same way → still suspect racialized violence
- Officers using force on people of color
-Unconscious racial bias: most of us unconsciously associate people of color
with crime (black/ latino)

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- Because of what we are exposed to everyday (tv, news, books)
- Police officer looks at white and black person doing the same thing →
unconsciously associate blacks with suspicious
- Influence police & their behaviors
- Artificial intelligence: develops mathematical algorithms
- Understand our language → get google news
- Developing unconscious racial bias as well
- Why? DISCRETION
-Stereotype threat: the fear of confirming a negative stereotype of a group to
which you belong
- Influenced by the stereotype
- I.e. about to take a difficult math test → some might say “because
you’re a woman and black that you’re not good at it”
- Worried if didn’t do well, then confirms the negative stereotype
- When anxious about something → won’t do as well
- No correlation between race of police officer and stereotype threat
- “Police officers are racist”
- Study: went to different police offices, to find out if policers suffer
from stereotype threat → YES.
- Become anxious, can’t think clearly
- If have this threat → the more the officer is fearful, the more
likely to be racist and shoot against people (black) of color
- BUT WHY?
- 1. When are you going to be most worried? When
interacting when interacting with young black men
(that’s when the threat is highest)
- 2. When is the situation most dangerous? When
dealing with someone from a community that doesn’t
view us legitimate
- 3. Officers are trained to not use force if they can rely
on moral authority → problem: certain interactions,
the person they are talking to don’t give them
legitimacy
- One thing we can do: limit interactions between people on street to
exercise discretion
- Problems:
- 1. Police as a department. Management, supervisors → do
not trust what the officers are doing. What do they do?
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