Lec 13.docx

5 Pages
51 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHILOS 5
Professor
Daniel Pilchman
Semester
Winter

Description
Hunger in the US • 50 million households were food insecure in 2013 • One of the primary causes of food insecurity is financial insecurity: people don’t  always have enough money to buy enough food • How can we ensure that everybody has enough to eat without causing new moral  problems? Using Taxes Help the Food Insecure • If the problem is that people do not have enough money to buy food, then how  can we give them more money, specifically for food? • By taxing people who already have enough money, and give those tax revenues to  food insecure families as food stamps • Like SNAP • Rawl’s theory of distributive justice, specifically the Difference Principle, seems  to endorse such programs, because they prioritize helping the worst­off in society • The Harm Principle criticizes tax­based programs, because they unjustly infringe  on a person’s right to control their own property, in this case their money • A trend is beginning to emerge: the tension between social welfare and personal  liberty • “Redistribution is theft not ‘fairness’” An Alternative: How to make Food Cheaper • We could go a long way towards solving hunger in the US if we could help people  afford food • Most of the conversation so far has been about giving people more money to pay  for groceries • But in discussing the Farm Bill, it became clear that not only can policy and  practice change how much money people have, it can also influence the prices of  crops • Maybe instead of making people richer, we need to make food cheaper • That way, food­insecure families will be able to afford enough food to be secure  without having to infringe on the property rights of others to give them money What Makes Food Expensive? • We need to know which factors influence the cost of food • Farmers have to spend over $1 million just to start farming • Annual costs include property taxes, seed, fertilizer, pesticides, labor, water,  general maintenance • If foods are specially grown to be marketed as organic, fair trade, cage­free, etc.  producers must also pay for inspection and certification • There are costs associated with shipping food from farms to communities.  California produce travels an average of 5,000 miles (consider food surviving) GMOs • Genetically Modified Organisms represent a technological solution to the high  cost of foods • By alternating the DNA of crops, we can change how they grow, where they grow,  and how expensive they are to grow • GM is something that humans have been doing for a very long time in the form of  artificial selection, where farmers choose to breed crops and animals because they  display preferred traits • But the kinds of modifications of which we are now capable are far cry from  selective breeding Jonathan Rauch • Supports GMOs What are GMOs? • Different people have different ideas about what exactly GMO is • Rauch restricts his definition of GMOs to transgenic organisms: plants and  animals that have DNA added to their genome via artificially constructed vectors •
More Less

Related notes for PHILOS 5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit