Lec 21.docx

4 Pages
63 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHILOS 5
Professor
Daniel Pilchman
Semester
Winter

Description
Farm Subsidies: Anti The Big Picture • “What should I eat?” o Opened moral questions about the treatment of animals, which opened up  institutional dilemmas about CAFOs and how we produce food o Led us to other institutional dilemmas, like how we ought to deal with  food insecurity in our country o Which got us thinking of ways either to give money to the poor, or to  lower the cost of food through biotechnology and efficient farming  methods o These solutions help lower the cost of food, which combats hunger but  raise new moral concerns about the impact of modern agriculture on  health and the environment • Now what we turn to is subsidies – economic policies that artificially control food  process­ as an alternative way to lower food prices What are farm subsidies? • Subsidies are payments from the government to supplement the normal earnings  that farmers make by selling their crops • Generally, these take the form of subsidizes crop insurance: farmers are forced to  buy insurance to protect themselves if their crops fail, but the government pays  62% of their premiums • It is estimated tat the government pays upwards of $25 billion each year in federal  crop insurance • Subsidies can be “coupled” or “decoupled” to what people grow, which means  that some farmers receive subsidies even if they don’t grow anything • Subsidies are also a lifeline to struggling farmers in years when bad weather or  pest invasion destroys a crop The Benefits of Farm Subsidies • Cheaper food: because farmers receive money form the government, they do not  need to charge consumers enough to make ends meet o This means that food is less expensive, so there will be fewer food  insecure households • Crop flexibility: because farmers know they will be supported no matter how their  crops do, they can experiment growing different and more nutritious foods o Only applies to decoupled subsidies (most criticized) • U.S. Food independence: because farmers receive these payments, farmers can  stay in business and farming remains an attractive and viable career choice o This means that we do not have to depend on other countries for our food.  We can feed ourselves Today’s Article • Michael Pollan • Critic of agricultural subsidies • Arguments are underdeveloped Obesity and Income • Article’s question “why are the poorest groups in our society also the most  overweight?” • After all, historically, only the wealthiest people were overweight, because only  they could afford enough food calories to become overweight • Now, statistically speaking, income is inversely proportional
More Less

Related notes for PHILOS 5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit