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Lecture 2

ANTHRO 169 Lecture Notes - Lecture 2: Arson, Fallacy, Premarital SexPremium


Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANTHRO 169
Professor
Jeffrey Brantingham
Lecture
2

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1
ANTHRO. 169: WEEK 1 - WEDNESDAY LECTURE
The Agenda Fallacy
Most proposed solutions to crime are part of a larger agenda.
There are certain agendas, such as political and moral agendas, to argue that by following
these agendas crime rates would decrease.
Political, religious, moral, and social agendas.
What are politicians really trying to sell; what idea are they trying to sell by stating that
voting for them would decrease crime?
Example of prostitution: each country has certain ideologies and laws that allow
or restricts prostitution, which is why the law deals with prostitution in different
ways.
What is crime?
The Whatever-You-Think Fallacy
- Crime is whatever we think it is.
- It is manufactured by the state.
- There is no universal ideal that constitutes crime because there is no such thing.
- What is a crime in a general sense? Violations of the Law
IMPORTANT FACTS TO KEEP IN MIND ABOUT CRIME:
***”A behavior that breaks the law and leaves offender to public prosecution and
punishment” *** (Brantingham, lecture 2).
*** ”A behavior that breaks the law and leaves offender liable to public prosecution and
punishment” *** (Brantingham, lecture 2).
- Intentional crimes: knows it’s illegal to do something and still does it.
- Unintentional crimes: did not mean to commit a crime but behavior actually breaks the
law but negligent.
- “Absent justifications such as self-defense or incapacity” (Brantingham, lecture 2).
*** “A behavior that breaks the law and leaves offender liable to public prosecution and
punishment” ***(Brantingham, lecture 2).
- Belief that if a person is not punished by the police, the crime a person committed is not
really a crime.
Mala in se
A behavior that is clearly a crime, such as murder, rape, robbery, assault, arson,
burglary.
- Death penalty and military executions are perceived and acceptable crimes because
ultimately both scenarios account as mala in se
but the law does not make any legal
prohibitions towards these cases.
- This is also situational.
- Certain situations modulate whether something is mala in se or not.
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