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Lecture 11

ENGL 91C Lecture Notes - Lecture 11: Wilshire Boulevard, Raymond Chandler, Scopophilia

4 Pages
48 Views
Spring 2018

Department
English
Course Code
ENGL 91C
Professor
Lindsay Wilhelm
Lecture
11

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COMPONENTS OF NARRATION:
Narration point of view/person - the position of the narrator in relation to the story being told; first-
person, second-person, third-person, alternating.
Narrative time - the temporal relationship between the narrator and the events of the story; past,
present, historical present, future.
Narrative voice - how the narrator conveys the story.
NARRATIVE VOICE:
The qualities and character of the narrative persona - access to knowledge about events in the story
world and/or characters' interiority (limited vs. omniscient); storytelling approach (e.g. "telling" vs.
"showing," use of epistolary voice, stream-of-consciousness, and other techniques); tone or attitude
towards the story world (e.g. subjective, objective, naive, innocent, knowing, cynical); style of writing,
or speaking (e.g. colloquial, formal, satirical, lyrical, sparse); reliability.
UNRELIABLE NARRATORS:
A narrator who tells lies or half-truths, conceals crucial information, or otherwise violates the
expectations of truthfulness and integrity that the narrative has previously set up.
Some types of unreliable narrators: the innocent, the ignoramus, the fabulist, the con artist, the
madman/madwoman.
ESSAY # 2
Bring outline or proposal to lecture on Wednesday!
Outline/proposal MUST include: full-sentence thesis statement, at least three pieces of textual
evidence, short explanations for how each piece of evidence supports thesis.

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Description
COMPONENTS OF NARRATION: Narration point of view/person - the position of the narrator in relation to the story being told; first- person, second-person, third-person, alternating. Narrative time - the temporal relationship between the narrator and the events of the story; past, present, historical present, future. Narrative voice - how the narrator conveys the story. NARRATIVE VOICE: The qualities and character of the narrative persona - access to knowledge about events in the story world and/or characters' interiority (limited vs. omniscient); storytelling approach (e.g. "telling" vs. "showing," use of epistolary voice, stream-of-consciousness, and other techniques); tone or attitude towards the story world (e.g. subjective, objective, naive, innocent, knowing, cynical); style of writing, or speaking (e.g. colloquial, formal, satirical, lyrical, sparse); reliability. UNRELIABLE NARRATORS: Anarrator who tells lies or half-truths, conceals crucial information, or otherwise violates the expectations of truthfulness and integrity that the narrative has previously set up. Some types of unreliable narrators: the innocent, the ignoramus, the fabulist, the con artist, the madman/madwoman. ESSAY # 2 Bring outline or proposal to lecture on Wednesday! Outline/proposal MUST include: full-sentence thesis statement, at least three pieces of textual evidence, short explanations for how each piece of evidence supports thesis.
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