COGS 101C Lecture 3: Cogs 101C Lecture 3 4.11.17
Premium

4 Pages
80 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Cognitive Science
Course
COGS 101C
Professor
estherwalker
Semester
Spring

Description
Cogs 101C Lecture 3 : Foundations of language research: key questions and debates key questions and debate is language modular? is language innate? is every part of language innate? how unique is human language? where did language come from? Is language modular? modularity can refer to a few different ideas neural modularity: there are specific brain areas dedicated to specific cognitive functions cognitive modularity: specific aspects of cognitive processing are informationally encapsulated from other cognitive processes these two can be related: neural modularity implies cognitive modularity, but the reverse is not generally true How localized are the language functions in the brain? (neural modularity) How cognitively modular is language in the mind? neural modularity how are brain and behavior related? idea of phrenology, where the shape of the skill might reflect the internal form of the brain a lot of initial evidence about this relationship came from lesion studies localization of function Brocas area, idea that this was functionally responsible for speech production Wernickes area, left superior temporal gyrus, could produce language but it was often nonsensical, associated with language meaning and comprehension WernickeGeschwind Model simple model of language processing in the brain at some level, sound images of object names are stored in Wernickes area when we want to speak, information from those representations of those words would be sent along the arcuate fasciculus to Brocas area for production issues with this model language is not restricted to the left hemisphere regions outside of Wernickes and Brocas area seem important for language processing complete lesions of Brocas or Wernickes areas rarely lead to the particular permanent aphasias you would predict updated models must account for the variability and flexibility of how language is represented in the brain Cognitive modularity
More Less

Related notes for COGS 101C

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit