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Lecture 2

HISTORY 373 Lecture Notes - Lecture 2: De Jure, White Southerners


Department
History
Course Code
HISTORY 373
Professor
Fronc Jennifer
Lecture
2

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The new south and the “redeemers”
lynching: a form of terrorism, meant to control the newly-free black population
it was political, ideological, and material
characteristics shared by victims
it was symbolic and a parody of the U.S justice system
commercially-successful black men or black women who stepped out to say
something were usually targets for lynching
lynching announcements show:
the destruction of black lives = written into the entertainment of the south (and
north)
the law and the justice system doesn’t apply to black people (“you don’t count”)
by publishing it in a newspaper, it’s normalizing lynching/dehumanizing them
the victim would be taken to jail and have a “mock trial” and find the individual
guilty no matter what happens
executions happened in public, usually in town squares
Conclusion:
in the absence of “de jure” means of keeping Black Americans “in their place”,
white southerners developed a “de facto” way of reminding Black Americans of
the racial/gender/sexual order (and therefore social, political and economic) in the
New South
Ida B. Wells was one of a very few to speak out about/write about lynching. Why
her? What made her special or unique?
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