Jazz Lab Report.doc

4 Pages
63 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Music
Course
MUSIC 150
Professor
John Jenkins
Semester
Spring

Description
Chelsea Van Thof The Lively Arts Jazz Lab Report As a Lively Arts student, I have the rare opportunity to experience what I am learning about  th in a setting outside of the classroom. I will be going to the Bowker Auditorium, Thursday, March 8   at 8 PM, to watch the Jazz Showcase. Although the ticket does not say who will be performing, I  know a friend who is going and she informed me that it will be a showcase of UMass student jazz  ensembles. I have been to Bowker Auditorium before, so I have a clear picture of what the stage may  look like: possibly the biggest group set up at the back of the stage (more of a Big Band/Swing  ensemble) and then smaller groups set up closer to the front of the stage, all with their own style of  jazz that they practice. I am assuming that the music department created an ensemble for each era of  jazz, and that I will have heard a song from every era by the end of the night. Improvisation is a key  element of jazz, so I expect to hear it during every song. We have been taught that the best  improvisations sound almost planned. I don’t doubt the students’ abilities, but knowing this, I cannot  help but think that the improvisations may not be on par with what I have heard during lecture; they  may sound much more spontaneous and stray farther than what would add to the composition. The  students still have a lot to learn, after all.  Considering what I have learned from lecture, in my mind, jazz means freedom and rebellion.  It seems that once a style of Jazz is becoming too mainstream or refined, a group of musicians  decides to create a new style, and every time this has happened, the new style grows into something  monumental in the history of jazz. It is as if you cannot go wrong with jazz music, because even if  there is a mold set by whatever era the musician happens to be living in, they are able to break away  from those standards and develop their own, and these new standards become just as valid as the  current ones. It’s a great, reliable system that has been responsible for every style of jazz we have  today.  Chelsea Van Thof The Lively Arts Listening to Way Down Yonder in New Orleans, I immediately recognized the head of the  tune, which you could hear elements of throughout the entire song during improvisations. Most of the  improvisation sounded like collective improvisation, drawing from the New Orlean’s style of jazz,  with at least three instruments playing different solos at the same time. They all seemed to follow the  same riff, however. There were individual solos, like that of the piano, clarinet and trumpet, where I  heard ‘comping by supporting instruments. During the piano and trumpet solos, I noticed the walking  bass (very subtle) and the drummer, who seemed to be accompanying the two solos. It also sounded  like the saxophone was ‘comping for the clarinet solo nearing the end of the piece. Following this  was a drumming solo, leading into the finale of the song. Struttin’ with Some Barbecue was instantly recognizable as a big band jazz piece. It was set  up with different sections of instruments, with the saxophones in the front and the trumpets in the  back. The piano, bass and drums, composing the rhythm section, were set apart, as well. I tried to  recognize an AABA format during the head of the piece, but the last ‘A’ strayed from the beginning  of the repetition. The most noticeable part of the piece was how the head of the song was  incorporated strongly throughout the rest of the composition. Riffing played a strong part in this  piece, especially by the horns
More Less

Related notes for MUSIC 150

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit