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Lecture 1

FSCN 3615 Lecture 1: April 3-3
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4 Pages
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Department
Food Science and Nutrition
Course Code
FSCN 3615
Professor
Cherry Smith

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Food and Religion
What is the function of religion?
To explain the inexplicable
Tries to answer: what happens when we die?
Provides humans with a sense of control over nature
Provides an answer to death
Provides a means for socialization
Provides a reason to be nice to others
For some, it provides a sense of community
Some just believe in a greater power
Religion is culture bound: what does that mean?
Throughout time people have believed in Gods, what happens to Gods when people no longer
believe in them?
Neanderthals
Cro-magnons
Egyptians
Greeks
Romans
Vikings/Norses
Prehistoric times: 33,000 to 20,000 BC; created by Cro-Magnon humans living in Europe
Ancient Egyptians (31000 BC to 2600 BC)
Egyptian Gods:
Gods and Goddesses were well-toned and slim, youthful; many had animal heads and other human
heads
Greek Era: 5th century BC
Greek Gods of old
Gods and Goddesses
Roman (753 BC-27 BC and 64 AD-1453 AD)
Gods and Goddesses
Neptune, the God of water and the sea
Venus, the Goddess of love
Crossover with Greek
Norse/Viking Gods
Loki, thor and Odin
Viking Era: 8th to 11th century
Religions
In the west:
Judaism
Christianity
Islam
In the east:
Hinduism
Buddhism
What do western religions have in common?
Monotheistic
Abrahamic tradition- origin stories similar
Worship a single God and God is male
God is to command humans are to obey

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Description
Food and Religion What is the function of religion? To explain the inexplicable Tries to answer: what happens when we die? Provides humans with a sense of control over nature Provides an answer to death Provides a means for socialization Provides a reason to be nice to others For some, it provides a sense of community Some just believe in a greater power Religion is culture bound: what does that mean? Throughout time people have believed in Gods, what happens to Gods when people no longer believe in them? Neanderthals Cro-magnons Egyptians Greeks Romans Vikings/Norses Prehistoric times: 33,000 to 20,000 BC; created by Cro-Magnon humans living in Europe Ancient Egyptians (31000 BC to 2600 BC) Egyptian Gods: Gods and Goddesses were well-toned and slim, youthful; many had animal heads and other human heads Greek Era: 5th century BC Greek Gods of old Gods and Goddesses Roman (753 BC-27 BC and 64 AD-1453 AD) Gods and Goddesses Neptune, the God of water and the sea Venus, the Goddess of love Crossover with Greek Norse/Viking Gods Loki, thor and Odin Viking Era: 8th to 11th century Religions In the west: Judaism Christianity Islam In the east: Hinduism Buddhism What do western religions have in common? Monotheistic Abrahamic tradition- origin stories similar Worship a single God and God is male God is to command humans are to obey
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