AMST 1154 Lecture 2: After the Columbian exchange: ethnic diversity and creolization (1-25)

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After the Columbian exchange: Ethnic diversity and
creolization
Why do we eat?
responsivity (nourishment)
group identity
pleasure (Taste)
convenience
From “taste” to the politics and history of food
food production/ preparation/ consumption is both person & public
today, the US food system accounts for 12% of gross national product and 17% of the
workforce
the US imports annually $80 billion of food; the US exports an equal amount of food
“Global of economy” of food the interconnectedness of the world’s food
Group Identity as difference
Attachment or identity with a particular group for purposes of signifying difference
Belonging to a group community often defined by those outside the community (e.g.
race, ethnicity, religious, class) for purposes of define as differentiating “outsider status
Belong to a group community as an outcome of external definitions as well as individual
allegiance
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Belonging to a group community see as an outside of “individual choice an effect of
individualism”
When different understood as “individual choice” all difference may become
Group Identity as Ethnicity
Generally, term used to connote and define “difference” from whiteness
Group identity based on racial assignment, religious, national heritage
Historically changing, dynamic not fixed and static
Changing variable pas that has served different purposed
Brief return to the past typically eating habits before
industrialization
In 1800, more than 50% the world-wide population was required to produce food
Most settlers in the US lived on small, family farms, growing most of their own food
American diet was based regularly on what the household could produced
Townspeople depended on household gardens, local farms’ markets, and small general
stores (Philadelphia, Boston, Charleston, New York)
Food was generally plentiful in all regions (in contrast with the scarcity of food in
Europe)
Typical early republican meal (late 1700s early 1800s)
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