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Lecture 5

MSE 2010 Lecture Notes - Sterling Silver, Big Bang, Electrum

4 Pages
67 Views
Fall 2016

Department
Materials Science and Engineering
Course Code
MSE 2010
Professor
garryshiflet
Lecture
5

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MSE 2010
Notebook
29 August 2016
EarlyMan-F16-slides 11-35
if there is metal inside of the rock, then it is called an ore. it is first used for decoration then
for iron
stone age = all about survival, no sleep
obsidian, exactly like window glass ( nature’s window glass). A lot of impurities. they come
out of volcanoes, thus found far from origin.
Flint has a periodic atomic structure. Colours change because of impurities
fire —> flint + iron . Found iron later so it took time
you get iron from the ore by…
Ocean cools the lava from the volcano really quickly to make obsidian
we have shitload of Oxygen, second most Silica.
many rocks are oxides, Oxygen attacks metals a lot.
far right in periodic table = noble elements
deeper you go, hotter it gets because of radioactivity
surface reflects what is going on internally
long range order = perfect hexagons = crystalline = periodic atomic structure
flint has long range order but obsidian does not, thus obsidian is not a crystalline. Both have
short range order tho
obsidian wants to look like flint/crystalline (lacks the systematic arrangement) but can’t
because of cooling in water
systematic structure (hexagons) =flint not hexagons = obsidian SINAVD SORUSU(S25)
pulling = stress & stretching = stress
harder the stretch, stronger is the rubber band
stone and wood stretch linearly up to a point
stiffness, steel and iron has very good stiffness but not wood. sallayinca sallaniyor dup
durmuyo
MSE 2010
!1
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find more resources at oneclass.com MSE 2010 Notebook 29 August 2016 EarlyMan-F16-slides 11-35 if there is metal inside of the rock, then it is called an ore. it is first used for decoration then • for iron • stone age = all about survival, no sleep • obsidian, exactly like window glass ( nature’s window glass). A lot of impurities. they come out of volcanoes, thus found far from origin. • Flint has a periodic atomic structure. Colours change because of impurities • fire —> flint + iron . Found iron later so it took time • you get iron from the ore by… • Ocean cools the lava from the volcano really quickly to make obsidian • we have shitload of Oxygen, second most Silica. • many rocks are oxides, Oxygen attacks metals a lot. • far right in periodic table = noble elements • deeper you go, hotter it gets because of radioactivity • surface reflects what is going on internally • long range order = perfect hexagons = crystalline = periodic atomic structure • flint has long range order but obsidian does not, thus obsidian is not a crystalline. Both have short range order tho • obsidian wants to look like flint/crystalline (lacks the systematic arrangement) but can’t because of cooling in water • systematic structure (hexagons) =flint not hexagons = obsidian SINAVD SORUSU(S25) • pulling = stress & stretching = stress • harder the stretch, stronger is the rubber band • stone and wood stretch linearly up to a point • stiffness, steel and iron has very good stiffness but not wood. sallayinca sallaniyor dup durmuyo MSE 2010 !1 find more resources at oneclass.com find more resources at oneclass.com 31 August 2016 - yellow flame(campfire) around 600 C o - pyrotechnology = ability to control fire - ceramic, one of the oldest material - clay —> sticks,slippery clay has plastic properties ? - bellspark, one of the most common materials, it melts and penetrates - china was into ceramics while Europe was into iron/metals - temperature = a numbered scale develop for heat, it is just a measurement - clay helps you shape the object you store - fire = uncontrolled oxization - a full pit kiln = uses oxygen as fuel - wood= a chain of carbon atoms - irons in mountain gets oxidized to iron oxide. Only GOLD does not get oxidised 5 September 2016 - thermal energy = vibration of atoms - Base center cubic —> copper, silver,led,bronze and gold !if you don’t know just guess this! - gold, silver and copper are the 3 metals you can find in the nature in its native form - native metals = you find them on the ground, you can use them - furnace&kiln = tech used to develop high temperatures - slag = waste byproduct created during smelting - metallic age started when people started to use smelting - almost every metal gets attacked by Oxygen or Sulphur - Copper was used for making decorations, art objects and tools as it has strength - furnace vs kiln = furnace is more developed, has blow pipes to get Oxygen in it o - approximate temperature for a campfire( yellow fire) is 600 C - copper is stiffer and much stronger than rock - first bronze used copper-arsenic (which had toxic gas killing the smelters) not tin - cassiterite, no native tin, it has to be smelted - copper is to come by, tin is not MSE 2010 !2 find more resources at oneclass.com find more resources at oneclass.com 7 September 2016 - Iron/steel are the democratic metals, they are the cheapest and the best material, also ab
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