RNT1 Lecture Notes - Lecture 1: Scientific Method, Net Force, Caesium

11 views4 pages
26 Sep 2019
Department
Course
Professor
Physics 110
Spring 2017
Tom MacMullen
1/20
Chapter 1
What is Physics?
Physics attempts to explain the universe and how it works by breaking it into its smallest
possible components and, given the interactions among them, deduce how the universe works at
all levels.
For us for the time being: Physics is the study of motion.
How physics (and science) is done.
The Scientific Method.
1. Observation — Newton sees an apple fall
2. Hypothesis — A force called gravity pulled the apple to the Earth
3. Prediction — Same force of gravity holds the Moon in orbit about the Earth
4. Experiment — Measure the motion of the Moon
5. Conclusion — If the prediction and the result of the experiment disagree within experimental
uncertainty then the hypothesis is rejected. If the prediction and the experimental result agree
within the uncertainty, the hypothesis is supported.
The ultimate decision as to the validity of a scientific idea is how well it predicts the results of
experiments.
Note: The scientific method as described above is an ideal. No single scientist or group of
scientists follow the method as described. However science follows the spirit of the scientific
method—no idea is accepted unless it is supported by experimental evidence.
International System of Units (SI)
Unit of Distance: meter
Originally: One ten-millionth of the distance from north pole to equator
Original Standard - platinum-iridium bar with two finely engraved lines one meter apart.
Current: the meter is defined so that the speed of light is
Unlock document

This preview shows page 1 of the document.
Unlock all 4 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Get OneClass Notes+

Unlimited access to class notes and textbook notes.

YearlyBest Value
75% OFF
$8 USD/m
Monthly
$30 USD/m
You will be charged $96 USD upfront and auto renewed at the end of each cycle. You may cancel anytime under Payment Settings. For more information, see our Terms and Privacy.
Payments are encrypted using 256-bit SSL. Powered by Stripe.