PHYS 111

Introductory Physics for the Physical Sciences I

University of British Columbia - Okanagan

Introduction to mechanics primarily for students majoring in the physical sciences (e.g. physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science, geology, physical geography) or engineering. Particle kinematics and dynamics, work and energy, momentum, gravitation, rigid body motion, fluid statics and dynamics with applications to the physical sciences. Credit will be granted for only one of PHYS 111 and PHYS 112. Students with Physics 12 may apply for a tutorial exemption.
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Mir Faizal

PHYS 111 Syllabus for Mir Faizal — Fall 2018

Download
University of British Columbia - Okanagan PHYS
111
Mir Faizal
1 Course Content
1. Part 1 : Introduction
2. Part 2 : Motion and Force
3. Part 3: Energy and Conservation laws
4. Part 4 : Fluids and related topics
2 Syllabus
Introduction to mechanics, displacement, velocity, acceleration. Instantaneous
velocity as an example of limit and differentiation. Motion with constant accel-
eration. Vectors, coordinate systems, and components of a vector. Motion in
two and three dimensions as an application of vectors. Force and Newtons laws
of motion. Gravitational Force and Newtons laws of Gravity. Work and Energy.
Potential energy, Kinetic energy, and Conservation of energy. Conservation of
Momentum and Collisions. Rigid body motion, Fluids and related topics.
3 Books and On-line Material
1. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: A Strategic Approach with Modern
Physics and Mastering Physics by Randall D. Knigh
2. The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Volume I by Feynman, Leighton and
Sands,
http ://www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/Itoc.html
3. Schaum’s Outline of College Physics by Frederick J. Bueche
4. Lectures on Dynamics and Relativity by David Tong,
http ://www.damtp.cam.ac.uk/user/tong/relativity.html
5. Mechanics (Berkeley Physics Course, Vol. 1), by Charles Kittel, Walter
D. Knight, Malvin A. Ruderman, A. Carl Helmholz and Burton J. Moyer
6. An Introduction to Mechanics by Kleppner and Kolenkow
1
4 Important Note
These books can be used as a reference. But it very important that you attend
the class regularity. As this is a first course in mechanics, you will not only learn
mechanics, but also the ability to transform abstract ideas into mathematics,
and this ability will help you in other courses too. Also the exams will be from
the material presented in the class, and this is what you will be required to
understand. It is very important that you ask me to clarify any thing which is
not clear in the lectures, and I will do it for you. You can also meet me after
the lecture for extra help, if you do not understand any concept.
5 Objectives of Course
1. To develop the ability to translate abstract ideas into mathematics. In
physics abstract ideas relation to the world are converted into concrete
mathematical models. Even though this course will be about mechan-
ics, this ability will be useful in many other areas, where you can build
mathematical models.
2. This course will be a first course in mechanics, and many other courses
on physics (and many other areas of natural sciences) will require the
concepts you have learned in this course. Physics is about objects moving
in space and time, and this course is a course about basic properties of
motion. So, the material you will learn in this course will be useful to you
in many different areas of natural science. You will also learn the uses of
mathematical concepts like vectors and calculus. These concepts will be
important for you to in other branches of physics, and even other fields of
science.
6 Other Information
6.1 Marks
Marks are distributed as follows: Labs 20/100, finals 50/100, and midterms and
assignments 30/100.
To pass this course you must achieve at least 50/100 in the laboratory com-
ponent, and receive a score of at least 40/100 on the final exam.
6.2 Midterms
The midterms will be conducted in the class at the time/place where the class
is usually conducted. Mid term will be conducted on Monday 5 Nov.
6.3 Labs
You must register in one of the laboratory sessions. Labs will start the week of
Sept. 17. You can purchase a lab manual from the used bookstore. You need
to complete each weekly prelab prior to your lab period.
2
6.4 My Contact
Name: Mir Faizal, Tel No: +12508997031, Email: mirfaizalmir@gmail.com, Of-
fice: SC103
6.5 Lab Manager
Name: Hiroko Nakahara, Office: Science 258, email: hiroko.nakahara@ubc.ca
6.6 Disability Assistance
If you require disability-related accommodations to meet the course objectives,
please contact the Accessibility Advisor.
Name: Meghan Currie, Tel No: 250-807-8041, Email: meghan.currie@ubc.ca
Office: Room 214B.
6.7 Office Hours
My office is in SC103, and my Office Hours are 10.30-12.25 Wednesday. But
you can contact me any time. You can also fix a meeting anytime by calling me
or sending me an email.
6.8 Prerequisite and Corequisite
Prerequisite: One of MATH 12, PREC 12, MATH 125, MATH 126 and PHYS
11. Physics 12 is strongly recommended.
Corequisite: MATH 100.
3

Faizal, Mir

PHYS 111 Syllabus for Faizal, Mir — Fall 2018

Download
University of British Columbia - Okanagan PHYS
111
Mir Faizal
1 Course Content
1. Part 1 : Introduction
2. Part 2 : Motion and Force
3. Part 3: Energy and Conservation laws
4. Part 4 : Fluids and related topics
2 Syllabus
Introduction to mechanics, displacement, velocity, acceleration. Instantaneous
velocity as an example of limit and differentiation. Motion with constant accel-
eration. Vectors, coordinate systems, and components of a vector. Motion in
two and three dimensions as an application of vectors. Force and Newtons laws
of motion. Gravitational Force and Newtons laws of Gravity. Work and Energy.
Potential energy, Kinetic energy, and Conservation of energy. Conservation of
Momentum and Collisions. Rigid body motion, Fluids and related topics.
3 Books and On-line Material
1. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: A Strategic Approach with Modern
Physics and Mastering Physics by Randall D. Knigh
2. The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Volume I by Feynman, Leighton and
Sands,
http ://www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/Itoc.html
3. Schaum’s Outline of College Physics by Frederick J. Bueche
4. Lectures on Dynamics and Relativity by David Tong,
http ://www.damtp.cam.ac.uk/user/tong/relativity.html
5. Mechanics (Berkeley Physics Course, Vol. 1), by Charles Kittel, Walter
D. Knight, Malvin A. Ruderman, A. Carl Helmholz and Burton J. Moyer
6. An Introduction to Mechanics by Kleppner and Kolenkow
1
4 Important Note
These books can be used as a reference. But it very important that you attend
the class regularity. As this is a first course in mechanics, you will not only learn
mechanics, but also the ability to transform abstract ideas into mathematics,
and this ability will help you in other courses too. Also the exams will be from
the material presented in the class, and this is what you will be required to
understand. It is very important that you ask me to clarify any thing which is
not clear in the lectures, and I will do it for you. You can also meet me after
the lecture for extra help, if you do not understand any concept.
5 Objectives of Course
1. To develop the ability to translate abstract ideas into mathematics. In
physics abstract ideas relation to the world are converted into concrete
mathematical models. Even though this course will be about mechan-
ics, this ability will be useful in many other areas, where you can build
mathematical models.
2. This course will be a first course in mechanics, and many other courses
on physics (and many other areas of natural sciences) will require the
concepts you have learned in this course. Physics is about objects moving
in space and time, and this course is a course about basic properties of
motion. So, the material you will learn in this course will be useful to you
in many different areas of natural science. You will also learn the uses of
mathematical concepts like vectors and calculus. These concepts will be
important for you to in other branches of physics, and even other fields of
science.
6 Other Information
6.1 Marks
Marks are distributed as follows: Labs 20/100, finals 50/100, and midterms and
assignments 30/100.
To pass this course you must achieve at least 50/100 in the laboratory com-
ponent, and receive a score of at least 40/100 on the final exam.
6.2 Midterms
The midterms will be conducted in the class at the time/place where the class
is usually conducted. Mid term will be conducted on Monday 5 Nov.
6.3 Labs
You must register in one of the laboratory sessions. Labs will start the week of
Sept. 17. You can purchase a lab manual from the used bookstore. You need
to complete each weekly prelab prior to your lab period.
2
6.4 My Contact
Name: Mir Faizal, Tel No: +12508997031, Email: mirfaizalmir@gmail.com, Of-
fice: SC103
6.5 Lab Manager
Name: Hiroko Nakahara, Office: Science 258, email: hiroko.nakahara@ubc.ca
6.6 Disability Assistance
If you require disability-related accommodations to meet the course objectives,
please contact the Accessibility Advisor.
Name: Meghan Currie, Tel No: 250-807-8041, Email: meghan.currie@ubc.ca
Office: Room 214B.
6.7 Office Hours
My office is in SC103, and my Office Hours are 10.30-12.25 Wednesday. But
you can contact me any time. You can also fix a meeting anytime by calling me
or sending me an email.
6.8 Prerequisite and Corequisite
Prerequisite: One of MATH 12, PREC 12, MATH 125, MATH 126 and PHYS
11. Physics 12 is strongly recommended.
Corequisite: MATH 100.
3

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