EECS 1019

Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science

York University

Introduction to abstraction. Use and development of precise formulations of mathematical ideas. Informal introduction to logic; introduction to naÔve set theory; induction; relations and functions; big O-notation; recursive definitions, recurrence relations and their solutions; graphs and trees. Three lecture hours per week. Plus drop-in optional problem sessions as well as instructor office hours, as these are announced in each term.
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John Michael Machacek

EECS 1019 Syllabus for John Michael Machacek — Fall 2018

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COURSE OUTLINE
SC/MATH 1019B 3.00 - FALL 2018
DISCRETE MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE
Basic Information
Instuctor: John Machacek
Email:machacek@yorku.ca
Office: 2025 DB (Victor Phillip Dahdaleh Building)
Office hours: Tuesday 1:15pm - 2:15pm, Thursday 10:00am - 11:00am
Classroom: VH B (Vari Hall Room B)
Days and Times: Tuesday & Thursday from 11:30am - 1:00pm
Webpage:www.yorku.ca/machacek/MATH1019B_F18
Textbook: Kenneth H. Rosen, Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications, McGraw-
Hill, 8th Edition
Course description: Introduction to abstraction. Use and development of precise
formulations of mathematical ideas. Informal introduction to logic; introduction to
nave set theory; induction; relations and functions; big O-notation; recursive defi-
nitions, recurrence relations and their solutions; graphs and trees.
The plan is to cover the following material from the text book.
Chapter 1: 1.1, 1.3 - 1.8
Chapter 2: 2.1 - 2.5
Chapter 3: 3.2
Chapter 5: 5.1 - 5.3
Chapter 8: 8.1 - 8.3
Chapter 9: 9.1, 9.3 - 9.5
Chapter 10: selected topics
Chapter 11: selected topics
Learning outcomes: It is my goal that at the conclusion of the course student
students will:
1. Understand what is (discrete) mathematics.
2. Understand the relevance and importance of discrete mathematics to the
field of computer science.
3. Understand how to write and recognize rigorous proofs.
Prerequisites: SC/MATH 1190 3.00, or two 4U Math courses, including MHF4U
(Advanced Function).
Course credit exclusions: LE/EECS 1028 3.00, SC/MATH 1028 3.00, SC/MATH
2320 3.00.
1
2COURSE OUTLINE SC/MATH 1019B 3.00 - FALL 2018 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE
Grades and Dates
Grades will determined by the following scheme with final grade assigned according
to York University’s grading scheme.
Homework 20%
Test 1 15%
Test 2 15%
Test 3 15%
Final exam 35%
There will be four homework assignments. The homework assignments will be
posted on the course webpage. The due dates for the homework assignments are
the following dates.
Homework 1 Sep. 20
Homework 2 Oct. 23
Homework 3 Nov. 20
Homework 4 Dec. 4
The three in class tests will be on the following dates. The tests will be 60 minutes.
Test 1 Oct. 2
Test 2 Nov. 1
Test 3 Nov. 29
The date of the final exam will be announced at a later time. The final exam will
be during the final exam period Dec. 6-21. Students should be aware the important
dates listed by the registrar’s office. These important dates include add/drop and
financial deadlines.
Course Policies
Missed or late homework: Homework is to be brought to class on the due date.
Late homework will not be excepted. If a student does not turn in ONE homework
assignment, then the students homework grade will be computed on the remaining
homework assignments without penalty. For students turning in all homework as-
signments, the lowest homework score will be omitted in computing the homework
score.
Missed tests: Students with a documented reason for missing ONE test, such as
illness, compassionate grounds, etc., which is confirmed by supporting documenta-
tion (e.g., doctor’s letter) may request accommodation from the Course Instructor
in the form of transferring the weight of the missed test (15%) to the final exam.
Missed final exam: The instructor must be notified by email no later than 24
hours after the missed final exam. To make up the final exam, an Attending
Physicians Statement (APS) must be completed by the students health provider,
and a clear photo or scan of the APS must be emailed to the instructor within
48 hours of the missed exam. The APS form can be downloaded from http:
//myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/deferred-standing. No other form
of doctors note will be accepted. The student must also complete and submit
COURSE OUTLINESC/MATH 1019B 3.00 - FALL 2018DISCRETE MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE3
the Final Exam/Assignment Deferred Standing Agreement form within one week
after the missed final exam. If the APS meets the above requirements the in-
structor will sign the deferred standing agreement and the student will write an
exam set by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. If, however, the
APS does not meet the above requirements, there will be no agreement to de-
ferred standing and the student must petition their home Faculty. If the petition
is successful, the student will have the opportunity to write an exam at a date
the instructor chooses within the window handed down by the petitions commit-
tee. Complete details, information & deadlines for this process can be found at
http://myacademicrecord.students.yorku.ca/deferred-standing.
Academic Integrity: All Students are Expected to Engage in Academically Hon-
est Work Academic integrity benefits everyone in our community. It not only helps
you reach the real goal of this class-learning, but also allows for the university and
program to be perceived positively by others. When students are dishonest, they
lose out on valuable learning that will help them perform well in their career. It can
also negatively impact all of the students in the program and at the institution by
creating negative mindsets which may result in fewer outside learning opportunities
for students. Academic dishonesty is any attempt by a student to gain academic
advantage through dishonest means or to assist another student with gaining an
unfair advantage. Academic integrity is important regardless of whether the work
is graded or ungraded, group or individual, written or oral. Dishonest acts are ma-
jor academic offences and carry serious penalties, ranging from a failing grade on
the plagiarized work to expulsion from the university. For more details, see York’s
Academic Honesty Policy and information on Academic Integrity for Students.

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