CHE 131

General Chemistry IB

Stony Brook University

This is the initial course in the four-semester General-Chemistry/Organic-Chemistry sequence CHE 131/132/321/322. This sequence provides the necessary foundation for students who wish to pursue further coursework in Chemistry. The General Chemistry courses provide a broad introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry, including substantial illustrative material drawn from the chemistry of inorganic, organic, and biochemical systems. The emphasis is on basic concepts, problem-solving, and factual material. The principal topics covered are stoichiometry, the states of matter, chemical equilibrium and introductory thermodynamics, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, electron structure and chemical bonding, and chemical periodicity. Students will be placed into CHE 131 based on their performance in an Online Chemistry Placement and Preparation (OCPP) process. The four-semester sequence is inappropriate for students who have completed an AP course in chemistry and received a score of 4 or 5; these students are placed into CHE 152. Three lecture hours and one 80-minute workshop per week. May not be taken for credit in addition to CHE 129 or CHE 152. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.
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CHE 131 Syllabus for Benjamin Hsiao — Fall 2018

CHE 131 Fall 2018 Schedule of Assignments Page 1 of 2
Week Day Reading Workshop
#Topic # Topics
1 Mon 08-27 1.1-3 1 RL Introduction to Che-131;Properties of Matter Units; Unit Analysis
Wed 08-29 1.4-5 2 RL Measurements and Units
Fri 08-31 2.1-6 3 RL Components of Matter; atomic theory 1 33
2 Mon 09-03 No class - Labor Day
Wed 09-05 2.7-9 4 BH Compounds & Mixtures;Introduction to bonding
Fri 09-07 3.1 5 BH The Mole 2* 45
3 Mon 09-10 3.2 6 JJ
Empirical & Molecular Formulas
The Mole; Molar Mass;
Determination of Molecular
Formulas
Wed 09-12 3.3-4 7 JJ Chemical Reactions; Stoichiometry
Fri 09-14 3.4 8 JJ Limiting Reactants and reaction yield
4 Mon 09-17 9 JJ Catchup & Review Review for Exam 1
Tue 09-18 Exam 1, 8:45 - 10:15 PM, through lecture 8 342
Wed 09-19 4.1 10 JJ Electrolytes;Solution Concentration; Dilutions
Fri 09-21 4.2-3 11 JJ Aqueous Ionic reactions; Precipitation 4* 7
5 Mon 09-24 4.4 12 JJ
Acid-Base Reactions;Stoichiometry;Titrations
Solution Concentration
Solution Stoichiometry
Wed 09-26 4.5-6 13 JJ Redox Reactions
Fri 09-28 5.1-3 14 JJ Gases; Pressure; Gas Laws 5 18
6 Mon 10-01 5.5-6 15 JJ
Manipultating the Ideal Gas Law; Gas Density,
Daltons Law; Reaction Stoichiometry
The Ideal Gas Law
Partial Pressures
Wed 10-03 6.1-2 16 JJ
Kinetic-Molecular Theory; Effusion; Diffusion;
Real Gases
Fri 10-05 6.3 17 JJ
Forms of Energy and their Interconversion;
Enthalpy Change
625
7 Mon 10-08 No Class - Fall Break
Wed 10-10 6.3 18 JJ
Calorimetry; Measuring the energy associated
with a chemical or physical change
Internal Energy & Enthalpy
Thermochemistry
Hess's Law
Fri 10-12 6.4-5 19 JJ
Stoichiometry of Thermochemical Equations;
Hess's Law; Standard Enthalphies
7* 4
8 Mon 10-15 6.5-6 20 RL Hess's Law; Standard Enthalphies
Wed 10-17 7.1-2 21 RL Light, Spectra, and the Bohr Model of Hydrogen Review for Exam 2
Fri 10-19 7.3-4 22 RL Quantum Mechanical Model of Hydrogen
9 Mon 10-22 8.1-2 23 RL
Electron Configurations and Chemical
Periodicity
Wed 10-24 24 RL
Catchup & Review
Exam 2, 8:45 - 10:15 PM, through lecture 22
Atomic Orbitals
Electron Configurations
817
Fri 10-26 8.3-4 25 RL Periodic Trends
10 Mon 10-29 9.1-4 26 RL
Models of Chemical Bonding; Lewis symbols;
Ionic bonding model; covalent bonding model;
bond energies
Wed 10-31 10.1 27 RL
Depicting molecules and ions with Lewis
structures; Resonance & Formal Charge
Lewis Structures
Periodic Trends
Fri 11-02 10.1 28 RL Exceptions to the Octet Rule 9* 42
11 Mon 11-05 10.2 29 BH
Valence-Shell Electron-Pair Repulsion (VSEPR)
theory
Wed 11-07 10.3 30 BH Molecular shape and Polarity VSEPR Model
Fri 11-09 11.1-2 31 BH Valence Bond theory; Modes of orbital overlap 10 18
12 Mon 11-12 11.3 32 BH
Molecular Orbital Theory
Radioactivity
Rates of Radioactive Decay
Lecture
ALEKS
All reading assignments are chapter and sections from Silberberg
* indicates a scheduled assessment after the ALEKS objective; plan an additional 1.5 hrs for this.
CHE 131 Fall 2018 Schedule of Assignments Page 2 of 2
Week Day Reading Workshop
Lecture
ALEKS
Wed 11-14 9.5, 12.3 33 BH Intermolecular Forces
Fri 11-16 24.1 34 BH Nucleosynthesis, Radioactive Decay 11* 12
13 Mon 11-19 24.2 35 BH Kinetics of Radioactive decay
Wed 11-21 No class - Thanksgiving Break
Fri 11-23 No class - Thanksgiving Break
14 Mon 11-26 36 RL Catchup & Review Review for Exam 3
Tue 11-27 Exam 3, 8:45 - 10:15 PM, through lecture 35 12 11
Wed 11-28 24.3-7 37 RL
Nuclear transmutation;Aplications of
radioisotopes; Interconversion of mass and
energy
Fri 11-30 15.1-2 38 BH
Organic Molecules and Functionalities
Alkane Nomenclature
Functional Groups
15 Mon 12-03 15.3-4 39 BH
Oganic Reactions; Properties and reactivities of
common functional groups
Wed 12-05 15.5 40 BH Monomers and Polymers
Fri 12-07 15.6 41 BH Biological Macromolecules Review for the Final Exam 13* 20
16 Mon 12-10 42 BH Catchup & Review
Mon 12-17
Final Exam, 8:15 - 10:45 AM, Early Morning 14 Open
All reading assignments are chapter and sections from Silberberg
* indicates a scheduled assessment after the ALEKS objective; plan an additional 1.5 hrs for this.
Each student is responsible for knowing all procedures and course expectations detailed in this document, in other
handouts or announced during lectures or workshops or in Blackboard. Failure to attend a lecture or workshop is not
an excuse for not knowing what was presented or announced. If you miss a lecture or workshop it is your
responsibility to find out what transpired from a fellow student, or from your instructor.
Fall 2018
Stony Brook University
Department of Chemistry
College of Arts and Sciences
CHE 131-E: General Chemistry IB, Sections 01-02
Instructors:
Professors Jiangyong Jia, Roy Lacey and Benjamin Hsiao conduct the MWF lectures, prepare exams, and oversee the course.
Dr. Troy Wolfskill coordinates the weekly Workshop/Recitation sessions, examinations, and grading.
Dr. Brad Tooker coordinates the help sessions in the Chemistry Learning Center.
Talented undergraduate and graduate teaching assistants facilitate the Workshops and staff the Chemistry Learning Center.
Office Hours: See Blackboard/CHE 131.01-02/Staff Information for current office hours for all instructional staff.
Email: che131@stonybrook.edu. Please do not use personal email addresses as your message may be lost or overlooked.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is the initial course in the four-semester General-Chemistry/Organic-Chemistry sequence CHE
131/132/321/322. This sequence provides the necessary foundation for students who wish to pursue further coursework in
Chemistry. The General Chemistry courses provide a broad introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry, including
substantial illustrative material drawn from the chemistry of inorganic, organic, and biochemical systems. The emphasis is on basic
concepts, problem-solving, and factual material. The principal topics covered are stoichiometry, the states of matter, chemical
equilibrium and introductory thermodynamics, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, electron structure and chemical bonding, and
chemical periodicity. Students will be placed into CHE 131 based on their performance in an Online Chemistry Placement and
Preparation (OCPP) process. The four-semester sequence is inappropriate for students who have completed an AP course in
chemistry and received a score of 4 or 5; these students are placed into CHE 152. Three lecture hours and one 80-minute workshop
per week. May not be taken for credit in addition to CHE 129 or CHE 152. This course has been designated as a High
Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.
Prerequisite: Online Chemistry Placement and Preparation (OCPP) Process
Corequisite: MAT 125 or higher
COURSE OBJECTIVES: Expand students’ knowledge in the field of chemistry, foster critical and analytical thinking,
quantitative reasoning, problem solving, teamwork, oral and written communication, and metacognition. Specific learning
objectives for each lecture will be posted in Blackboard.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
Required Resources:
Text: A Connect Two-Year Access Card, (ISBN 9781260217865), $70, to Silberberg, 8th ed. (McGraw Hill, 2017) can be
purchased directly from McGraw-Hill through Blackboard for these prices. Purchases through the Follett bookstore will
carry additional charges. Once purchased, you can access the text on your computer or using McGraw-Hill’s Connect app
from Google Play or Apple. Access is for four semesters only. You may upgrade to a loose-leaf text version for $60
within Connect. For students requiring only one semester of chemistry, a One-Semester Access Card (ISBN
9781260224412) is also available for $40.
Assessment and LEarning in Knowledge Spaces (ALEKS) registration. See document “Registration Instructions”.
LUCID registration to access workshop activities and all course grades. See document “Registration Instructions”.
Turning Technologies Clicker for responding to questions in class. For registration instructions go to
https://it.stonybrook.edu/help/kb/buying-clickers or see the document Registration Instructions.
Nonprogrammable Scientific Calculator with exponents, powers, and logarithms.
Spare batteries for your calculator and response pad.
#2 pencils and erasers for each exam. Exams will be held as follows.
Ring binder to organize your work.
Blackboard.stonybrook.edu account is where all announcements, policies, and information will be posted.
For help accessing Blackboard click Help and Support at the site.
Each student is responsible for knowing all procedures and course expectations detailed in this document, in other
handouts or announced during lectures or workshops or in Blackboard. Failure to attend a lecture or workshop is not
an excuse for not knowing what was presented or announced. If you miss a lecture or workshop it is your
responsibility to find out what transpired from a fellow student, or from your instructor.
Stony Brook Email Account accessible at stonybrook.edu/mycloud. For help with Google Apps for Education see
http://it.stonybrook.edu/help/kb/logging-in-to-google-apps-for-education.
Exam Dates:
Exam 1, Tuesday September 25 8:45 PM-10:15 PM
Exam 2, Wednesday October 24 8:45 PM-10:15 PM
Exam 3, Tuesday November 27 8:45 PM-10:15 PM
Final Exam, Monday December 17 8:15 AM-10:45 AM ***Note that this is EARLY MORNING***
Attendance and Make Up Policy
You should attend the workshop sections to which you are assigned. All section changes will be handled through Solar.
Instructors will not sign change of section forms. If you have difficulty attending workshop section in which you are
registered, see Dr. Wolfskill during his office hours in Chemistry Room 104 or stop by his office in Chemistry Room 575.
There are no make ups for missed lectures, workshops, ALEKS deadlines, or midterm examinations. All absences will be
scored as a zero; the lowest scores for lecture, workshops, and quizzes are dropped at the end of the semester; exam scores are
not dropped. If a written excuse with appropriate documentation is presented within one week of your return to class, and, for
workshops, if you provide evidence of having completed the missed work, you may be excused, and the final score prorated.
Documents should be submitted as follows.
Exams and ALEKS: Prof. Jia, Lacey, Hsiao or Wolfskill Workshops: your workshop instructor
Lecture absences are not excused except in extreme circumstances as several grades are dropped at the end of the semester.
All students must take the final exam. Unexcused absence will result in a score of 0. A student who is unable to take the final
exam because of illness or other extenuating circumstances must contact an instructor before or within 24 hours following the
exam. Only then will a grade of incomplete (I) be assigned. The make-up final will be given Wednesday January 30, 2019
from 1:00 3:30 PM and appropriate documentation is required at that time. Failure to take the final or make-up exam will
result in a course grade of F.
Description and schedule of lectures and assignments.
MWF Class Lectures: Javits Lecture Center Room 100, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 11:00 11:53 AM; repeated at 2:30
3:23 PM in Javits 100. Lecture notes will be posted on Blackboard before each class. You will need to bring to each class pens or
pencils, a calculator, and a clicker for responding to in-class questions. These lectures include interactive learning sessions
designed to help you understand key concepts and apply them in exercises and problems. You will work on these activities in the
class and report your answers with your clicker. You will benefit most from these sessions if you prepare by completing the
reading assignment before the lecture.
Reading Assignments: Reading assignments in the online textbook will be accompanied by short quizzes that will be due the day
after the lecture at 11:00 AM. The first assignment will be due Thursday August 30th.
Workshop (Recitation) Sessions: You will need to bring to each workshop pens or pencils, a calculator, and a ring binder
containing your work for the class. Each team will also need a Team Report form (available in Blackboard). Individuals or teams
who fail to bring these may have points deducted from their workshop grade. The chemistry workshops are intended to help you
maximize your performance in introductory chemistry courses. During workshops you will work with a team of students on
activities designed to increase your understanding of course topics, your ability to apply these in simple contexts, and your ability
to solve problems. If you follow the guidelines, this approach will help everyone in your team learn as much as possible during
workshops. If you find chemistry challenging, your teammates and the instructor will help you gain the insights you need to
understand concepts and solve problems. If you find chemistry easy, you will find your performance improving as you explain
things to others. Team roles are used to distribute the responsibilities.
ALEKS: Regular online homework assignments are given via the ALEKS system. Solutions to these problems should be kept in
your three-ring binder. There will usually be one ALEKS assignment due each week Saturday at 11:59 PM covering material from
the previous Friday through Thursday readings, lectures and workshop. The first will be due Saturday August 31st at 11:59 PM.
Exams
Multiple-choice exams based on materials covered in the lectures, text, workshops, and ALEKS are scheduled as indicated above.
You must take each exam in the room to which you are assigned as will be posted in Blackboard. You must bring to each exam
two or more #2 pencils with erasers, your University ID, and a nonprogrammable scientific calculator with spare batteries. This is
Each student is responsible for knowing all procedures and course expectations detailed in this document, in other
handouts or announced during lectures or workshops or in Blackboard. Failure to attend a lecture or workshop is not
an excuse for not knowing what was presented or announced. If you miss a lecture or workshop it is your
responsibility to find out what transpired from a fellow student, or from your instructor.
all that is allowed on your desk. All other belongings must be placed out of sight beneath your seat or at the front of the room, and
electronic devices must be powered off. Violations may result in a report to Academic Judiciary and a course grade of F.
A review of all relevant materials will be conducted prior to each exam. Success on these exams will require that you understand
important concepts, as well as their use in solving problems relevant to the course material. If you understand assigned problems
in this way and test your understanding on problems that are not assigned, you are more likely to do well in this course.
GRADING: Course grades will be based on the percentage of points earned out of 600 with the following contributions.
200 pts, Final Exam
100 pts for each Midterm Exam (300 pts total for the Midterms)
30 pts, all reading assignments and lecture sessions
30 pts, all workshop sessions
40 pts, ALEKS, including both the average weekly score and the cumulative percentage of topics mastered
The lowest reading, lecture, workshop, and ALEKS scores will be dropped at the end of the semester. Final percent grades will be
rounded to one decimal place. Letter grades will be based on the percentage of points received with the following advisory cutoffs.
A: 90% B: 75% C: 60% D: 45% F: < 45%
Grades will be posted in LUCID after each exam. All issues with grades must be raised promptly after posting.
CLASS PROTOCOLS:
All cell phones must have the sound turned off during class sessions.
Talking while the instructor is talking or texting at any time will not be tolerated. Violators may be asked to leave and forfeit
any points associated with that meeting.
Questions regarding class topics are always welcome. During workshops, questions should be directed to the instructor
through the team manager. Questions that are not directly related to class topics should be directed to the instructor
immediately before or after class, and instructors will do their best to be available at these times. If the instructor is not
available immediately before or after class, questions can be taken to staff office hours or sent to che131@stonybrook.edu.
Do not bring food to any class meetings.
Stony Brook University expects students to: maintain standards of personal integrity that are in harmony with the educational
goals of the institution; to observe national, state, and local laws and University regulations; and to respect the rights,
privileges, and property of other people. Any behavior that interrupts the ability of instructors to teach, the safety of the
learning environment, and/or students' ability to learn will be reported to University Community Standards. Students who
display such behavior may be asked to consult with one of the course instructors or asked to leave a class session, whereupon
University Police will be notified. Information on campus policy regarding student disruptions can be found at
http://www.stonybrook.edu/sb/behavior.shtml.
COURSE RESOURCES:
Library resources: A few copies of the textbook will be placed on reserve in the Science and Engineering Library, Library N-1001,
also called the North Reading Room.
Blackboard: should be checked regularly for announcements, reading and homework assignments, lecture notes, help room
schedules, solutions to end-of-chapter problems, sample exams from previous semesters, and other important matters. Support for
Blackboard is available through the information at blackboard.stonybrook.edu.
Getting Help:
Help with concepts or assignments are available in the Chemistry Learning Center, Chemistry Building, Room 124. Hours
will be posted in Blackboard under Information. Such help should not be addressed to the course email. NOTE: While you can
seek help with ALEKS while in Learning Mode, you should not receive ANY help from any person, text, or other resource
while in Assessment Mode. Doing so will increase the amount and difficulty of your work.
Technical problems with Connect, clickers, or ALEKS must be addressed to their Technical Support as described in the
registration instructions for each. Please report any difficulties with technical support to Dr. Wolfskill.
Grading issues with ALEKS should be addressed by email to [email protected]u, or to Jia, Hsiao, Lacey and Wolfskill
during their office hours.
Each student is responsible for knowing all procedures and course expectations detailed in this document, in other
handouts or announced during lectures or workshops or in Blackboard. Failure to attend a lecture or workshop is not
an excuse for not knowing what was presented or announced. If you miss a lecture or workshop it is your
responsibility to find out what transpired from a fellow student, or from your instructor.
Issues with the Workshops should be addressed to your Workshop Instructor. Issues that cannot be resolved by your
instructor should be taken to Dr. Wolfskill during his office hours as posted on Blackboard under Staff Information.
Questions about course content, organization, grades, exams, or personal problems should be addressed to Jia, Hsiao and
Lacey, immediately after lectures or during their office hours.
Office hours for all instructors are posted under Staff Information in Blackboard.
Additional academic help may be available through the Academic Success & Tutoring Center
(stonybrook.edu/commcms/academic_success/).
DISABILITY SUPPORT SERVICES (DSS) STATEMENT:
If you have a physical, psychological, medical or learning disability that may impact your course work, please contact Disability
Support Services, ECC (Educational Communications Center) Building, Room 128, (631) 632-6748. They will determine with you
what accommodations, if any, are necessary and appropriate. All information and documentation is confidential.
Students who require assistance during emergency evacuation are encouraged to discuss their needs with their professors and
Disability Support Services. For procedures and information go to www.stonybrook.edu/ehs/fire/disabilities.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY STATEMENT:
Each student must pursue his or her academic goals honestly and be personally accountable for all submitted work. Representing
another person's work as your own is always wrong. The faculty is required to report any suspected instances of academic
dishonesty to the Academic Judiciary. For more comprehensive information on academic integrity, including categories of
academic dishonesty, please refer to the academic judiciary website at www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/academic_integrity.
In this course you are strongly encouraged to work with others to master the material in the text, lecture notes, workshops, and
ALEKS Objectives. However, in working with others to arrive at your response to a question, you must understand and be able to
explain the rationale behind your response and not just report someone else's answer. It is intellectually dishonest to report
someone else’s work and understanding as your own. Therefore, violations of the following will result in a course grade of F and
a report to the Academic Judiciary.
You must submit responses to in-class questions and problems only with your own device. Students using more than one
device will be considered in violation along with the student whose device they are using.
You must record and submit your own answers to Connect and ALEKS questions based on your understanding not on how
someone else told you to respond.
You must work independently when asked to do so.
You must take the examinations independently with no assistance from any other person, without the aid of any unauthorized
materials, and without access to any electronic communication devices.
CRITICAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT:
Stony Brook University expects students to respect the rights, privileges, and property of other people. Faculty are required to
report to the Office of Judicial Affairs any disruptive behavior that interrupts their ability to teach, compromises the safety of the
learning environment, or inhibits students' ability to learn. Faculty in the HSC Schools and the School of Medicine are required to
follow their school-specific procedures.
ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATION STATEMENT:
Email and especially email sent via Blackboard (http://blackboard.stonybrook.edu) is one of the ways the faculty officially
communicates with you for this course. It is your responsibility to make sure that you read your email in your official University
email account. For most students that is Google Apps for Education (http://www.stonybrook.edu/mycloud), but you may verify
your official Electronic Post Office (EPO) address at http://it.stonybrook.edu/help/kb/checking-or-changing-your-mail-forwarding-
address-in-the-epo.
If you choose to forward your official University email to another off-campus account, faculty are not responsible for any
undeliverable messages to your alternative personal accounts. You can set up Google Mail forwarding using these DoIT-provided
instructions found at http://it.stonybrook.edu/help/kb/setting-up-mail-forwarding-in-google-mail.
If you need technical assistance, please contact Client Support at (631) 632-9800 or [email protected]ook.edu.

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