Homework Help for Psychology

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Psychology is the study of mind behavior and mind. It concerns the biological influences, social pressures, and environmental factors that affect how people think, act, and feel.

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parentjenny226 asked for the first time
in Psychology·
2 Nov 2023

For this assignment, choose one picture or image from your environment, or one that you really
like (could be an image found online) that you will analyze using concepts from sensation and
perception. To be specific, you can use any monocular cue to 3-D perception, such as relative
size, relative height, shadow, occlusion, linear perspective, etc…).

The goal of this assignment is for you to be able to communicate important concepts in Depth
perception. These concepts help form our perceptions and understanding of the world around
us.
Your selected picture should be copied and pasted into a Word document (see my image
above). Below your picture, you will use a minimum of five perceptual concepts (monocular
cues) to explain and analyze your image. In other words, how is depth perception conveyed in
your image? Name the monocular cue, explain what it is or how it works, and describe where in
the picture we can observe it. Explain this in plain English, using simple terms. You will then
upload your assignment in the Lea Dropbox by Nov. 2.
Each picture/image analysis will be graded based on how well you (a) follow the instructions
here, (b) copied and pasted a picture from your environment into a Word file, and (c)
communicate correct information. If you do all of these things, you will get full credit. If you
don’t (e.g., you don’t enter an explanation of the image analysis along with your image file,
your analysis/explanation makes no sense, or your analysis contains inaccurate information,
etc…), you will lose points according

 

CHOSE ANY PIC FROM GOOGLE AND LET ME KNOW URGENT

in Psychology·
31 Oct 2023

For this assignment, choose one picture or image from your environment, or one that you really
like (could be an image found online) that you will analyze using concepts from sensation and
perception. To be specific, you can use any monocular cue to 3-D perception, such as relative
size, relative height, shadow, occlusion, linear perspective, etc…).

The goal of this assignment is for you to be able to communicate important concepts in Depth
perception. These concepts help form our perceptions and understanding of the world around
us.
Your selected picture should be copied and pasted into a Word document (see my image
above). Below your picture, you will use a minimum of five perceptual concepts (monocular
cues) to explain and analyze your image. In other words, how is depth perception conveyed in
your image? Name the monocular cue, explain what it is or how it works, and describe where in
the picture we can observe it. Explain this in plain English, using simple terms. You will then
upload your assignment in the Lea Dropbox by Nov. 2.
Each picture/image analysis will be graded based on how well you (a) follow the instructions
here, (b) copied and pasted a picture from your environment into a Word file, and (c)
communicate correct information. If you do all of these things, you will get full credit. If you
don’t (e.g., you don’t enter an explanation of the image analysis along with your image file,
your analysis/explanation makes no sense, or your analysis contains inaccurate information,
etc…), you will lose points accordi

 

CHOSE ANY PIC FROM GOOGLE AND LET ME KNOW URGENT

Avatar image
ruhibose2004 asked for the first time
in Psychology·
15 Oct 2023

Think of a movie where the actors have portrayed somebody from a different dialect area and either succeeded so well that they fooled you or failed miserably. What about linguistic stereotypes? Can you think of any linguistic stereotypes you noticed in a movie? 

Your answers should not be more than a paragraph. Simply think of linguistic stereotypes of a particular accent or dialect in a movie. Ensure to include the film's name and character(s). 

Here are two sample:

Response#1: In Deadpool and Deadpool 2, a character named Dopinder is an Indian cab driver. He only appears in the films briefly, but his role is a stereotype in that one of the few jobs Indians do is drive cabs. Although, that may be the only or one of the few stereotypes portrayed about this character. In the first film, he is only in a quick scene, while in the second film, his character develops a story arc, which is rare for these types of roles. Dopinder is played by Karan Soni, who is of Indian descent but born in America. Therefore, Soni has no Indian accent in his regular speech. However, when he plays Dopinder, his character has an Indian accent, which is done well. It sounds like he uses the retroflex ‘t’ and ‘d’ instead of alveolar ‘t’ and ‘d’, a noticeable and well-known marker for the Indian accent.

Response#2: In the movie Titanic, a character named Rose Dewitt Bukater is portrayed as a wealthy American Socialite. Rose, the film's main protagonist, is played by Kate Winslet, a British actress. Kate Winslet was born in England and, therefore, acquired English with a British accent, showing different pronunciations, grammar, vocabulary, etc. One of the most common differences between American and British accents is the pronunciation of /r/ in the middle or ending of a word. British people typically pronounce /r/ when it appears at the beginning of words. However, American people tend to pronounce /r/ throughout the term. This is demonstrated as Kate plays the upper-class, all-American character Rose; she can produce a compelling American accent due to the pronunciation of /r/ in words like “nerve.” The upper-class status of Rose is reflected through her dialogue speech. Rose uses standard and sophisticated language in all contexts; she even uses formal vocabulary when referring to other people. This is evident in her conversation with Jack:

Jack: “Well, it's a simple question. Do you love the guy?”...

Rose: “You are rude and uncouth, and presumptuous…Jack... Mister Dawson, it's been a pleasure.”

As seen in the conversation, when Rose refers to Jack by his first name, she corrects herself and calls him “Mister Dawson.” Instead, Jack (a lower-class artist) refers to the other person as a “guy.” In addition, Jack utilizes informal language, such as pronouncing “you” as /ja/, contrasting Rose’s formal speech. Lastly, Rose uses super polite forms such as “forgive me” when she disagrees with other men, then explains her reasoning. This presence of euphemism aligns with Lakoff’s claim on women’s speech, where women’s speech reflects their subordinate status in society.  

in Psychology·
15 Oct 2023

Think of a movie where the actors have portrayed somebody from a different dialect area and either succeeded so well that they fooled you or failed miserably. What about linguistic stereotypes? Can you think of any linguistic stereotypes you noticed in a movie? 

Your answers should not be more than a paragraph. Simply think of linguistic stereotypes of a particular accent or dialect in a movie. Ensure to include the film's name and character(s). 

Here are two sample responses:

Response#1: In Deadpool and Deadpool 2, a character named Dopinder is an Indian cab driver. He only appears in the films briefly, but his role is a stereotype in that one of the few jobs Indians do is drive cabs. Although, that may be the only or one of the few stereotypes portrayed about this character. In the first film, he is only in a quick scene, while in the second film, his character develops a story arc, which is rare for these types of roles. Dopinder is played by Karan Soni, who is of Indian descent but born in America. Therefore, Soni has no Indian accent in his regular speech. However, when he plays Dopinder, his character has an Indian accent, which is done well. It sounds like he uses the retroflex ‘t’ and ‘d’ instead of alveolar ‘t’ and ‘d’, a noticeable and well-known marker for the Indian accent.

Response#2: In the movie Titanic, a character named Rose Dewitt Bukater is portrayed as a wealthy American Socialite. Rose, the film's main protagonist, is played by Kate Winslet, a British actress. Kate Winslet was born in England and, therefore, acquired English with a British accent, showing different pronunciations, grammar, vocabulary, etc. One of the most common differences between American and British accents is the pronunciation of /r/ in the middle or ending of a word. British people typically pronounce /r/ when it appears at the beginning of words. However, American people tend to pronounce /r/ throughout the term. This is demonstrated as Kate plays the upper-class, all-American character Rose; she can produce a compelling American accent due to the pronunciation of /r/ in words like “nerve.” The upper-class status of Rose is reflected through her dialogue speech. Rose uses standard and sophisticated language in all contexts; she even uses formal vocabulary when referring to other people. This is evident in her conversation with Jack:

Jack: “Well, it's a simple question. Do you love the guy?”...

Rose: “You are rude and uncouth, and presumptuous…Jack... Mister Dawson, it's been a pleasure.”

As seen in the conversation, when Rose refers to Jack by his first name, she corrects herself and calls him “Mister Dawson.” Instead, Jack (a lower-class artist) refers to the other person as a “guy.” In addition, Jack utilizes informal language, such as pronouncing “you” as /ja/, contrasting Rose’s formal speech. Lastly, Rose uses super polite forms such as “forgive me” when she disagrees with other men, then explains her reasoning. This presence of euphemism aligns with Lakoff’s claim on women’s speech, where women’s speech reflects their subordinate status in society.  

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productsfm2 asked for the first time
in Psychology·
4 Oct 2023

The Hermann grid illusion is an optical illusion, a visual perception that differs from
objective reality. The illusion is characterized by "ghostlike" grey blobs perceived at the intersections of a
white (or light-colored) grid on a black background. The grey blobs disappear when looking directly at an
intersection. The scintillating grid illusion, discovered by E. Lingelbach in 1994, is variation of the
Hermann grid illusion. It is constructed by superimposing white discs on the intersections of orthogonal gray
bars on a black background. Dark dots seem to appear and disappear rapidly at random intersections, hence
the label “scintillating”. When a person keeps his or her eyes directly on a single intersection, the dark dot
does not appear.
You can find information about the Hermann Grid illusion in my Lecture notes for Class 5 – Neurons and
Perception – Part 1.
Purpose: To familiarize yourself with the Hermann grid illusion, and those factors that affect it.
Task: This assignment will assess what properties of the stimulus affect both of these illusions. For this
assignment you will be using the Hermann Grid (curving) illusion from Michael Bach’s website:
http://www.michaelbach.de/ot/lum-herGridCurved/index.html
Optical illusions & visual phenomena and explanations (where possible):
Optical Illusions & Visual Phenomena (michaelbach.de)
Before you begin, disable the switching of the illusion from boxes to curved lines by removing the check on
the Auto-Run button.
Using your knowledge of how the retina is structured, along with the organization of receptive fields,
describe and explain your perceptions of the following questions:
Please write legibly!
1) How is your perception of the Hermann grid affected by changes in width of the grid lines (change the
street lines wheel to make bigger or smaller)? Why?

2) The illusion is the strongest when the grid lines are mid-sized. Why?

3) What happens to the illusion when you decrease the contrast between the lines and the boxes? (i.e. gray

lines, black boxes using the colors box to change the line and box colors

 

4) Are there any colour combinations that make the illusion weaker? Why?

 

5) Why do the blobs not appear at the point of fixation, and only in the periphery?


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