OC6214

University of Toronto St. George

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UTSCPSYB57H3George CreeWinter

PSYB57H3 Chapter Notes - Chapter 11: False Alarms (1936 Film)

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31 Mar 2012
16
You call to mind a map of your house and count the windows by inspecting this map. Many people even trace the map in the air by moving their finger aro
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UTSCPSYB30H3Marc A FournierSummer

- FINAL EXAM (CHAP 7-12) DETAILED NOTES.docx

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6 Mar 2012
35
We act upon these wants, producing behaviour. Eric klinger applied some aspects of the darwinian theory to construct a definition of motivation, which.
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UTSCPHLB09H3Victoria BurkeSummer

Biomedical Ethics Final Exam Review

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13 May 2011
79
Biomedical ethics exam review (1) the reason medical futility should not be used as a reason to deny treatment. Wicclair defends the idea that medical
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UTSCPSYC37H3BouffardSummer

Psychological Assessment - Chapter 8 Book Notes

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13 May 2011
19
Similarities between an interview and a test include: www. notesolution. com: method for gathering data, used to make predictions, evaluated in terms o
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UTSCPSYC37H3BouffardSummer

Psychological Assessment - Chapter 7 Book Notes

OC62147 Page
13 May 2011
24
Reliability theory is concerned with random sources of error, but we must consider other potential sources of error such as testing situation, tester c
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UTSCPSYC37H3BouffardSummer

PSYC37H3 Chapter Notes - Chapter 5: Discriminant

OC62148 Page
13 May 2011
12
In many settings it is ideal to have a test that looks like it is valid, because these appearances can help motivate test takers since they can see tha
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UTSCPSYC37H3BouffardSummer

Psychological Assessment - Chapter 4 Book Notes

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13 May 2011
22
Discrepancies between the true ability and measurement of ability form errors of measurement: error means that there will always be some inaccuracy in
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UTSCPSYC37H3BouffardSummer

Psychological Assessment - Chapter 3 Book Notes

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13 May 2011
20
Univariate distribution: involve only one variable for each individual under study. Bivariate distribution: involves two scores for each individual. In
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UTSCPSYC37H3BouffardSummer

Psychological Assessment - Chapter 2 Book Notes

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13 May 2011
28
Using number systems allow us to manipulate information. Statistical methods serve two important purposes to aid in scientific understanding.  numbers
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UTSCPSYC37H3BouffardSummer

PSYC37H3 Chapter Notes - Chapter 1: World War I

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13 May 2011
18
Standardized tests tend to disadvantage women and ethnic minorities. Tests such as the lsat and gre are the most difficult modern psychological tests.
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 20 Book Notes

OC62143 Page
12 May 2011
27
Types of self-management strategies: goal-setting & self-monitoring, goal setting: writing down the criterion level of the target behaviour + the time
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 19 Book Notes

OC62143 Page
12 May 2011
16
 generalization occurred when they continued to use the communication responses in community settings.  her counsellor taught her skills to respond c
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 18 Book Notes

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12 May 2011
20
Chapter 18 positive punishment procedures & the ethics of. Punishment: positive punishment: aversive events are applied contingent on the occurrence of
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modification - Chapter 17 Book Notes

OC62143 Page
12 May 2011
16
Chapter 17 using punishment: time out & response cost. If a punishment procedure is used, it is often a negative punishment procedure involved removal
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modification - Chapter 16 Book Notes

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12 May 2011
21
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modification - Chapter 15 Book Notes

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12 May 2011
28
 response = mrs. williams says positive things www. notesolution. com.  outcome = in the future, she is more likely to say positive things when a nur
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modification - Chapter 14 Book Notes

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12 May 2011
12
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 25 Book Notes

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12 May 2011
24
Some target behaviours may be covert, that is not observable by another individual.  since cognitive behaviour are covert, they cannot be observed dir
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 24 Book Notes

OC62147 Page
12 May 2011
17
Fear and anxiety reduction procedures are based on principles of operant and responding conditioning.  allison experienced intense fear reactions when
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 12 Book Notes

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12 May 2011
20
 a child"s behavior of imitating models is reinforced many times in the presence of various behaviors model by people.  thus, a model"s behavior beco
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 11 Book Notes

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12 May 2011
40
Behavioral chain: a complex behavior consisting of many component behaviors that occur together in a sequence: example - if you a piece of human, you h
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 10 Book Notes

OC62148 Page
12 May 2011
22
Prompting gets the correct behavior to occur, while fading transfers stimulus control to the sd: the transfer of stimulus from the prompts should be do
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 9 Book Notes

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12 May 2011
29
 occurs when one particular behavior is reinforced and all other behaviors are not reinforced in a particular situation.  thus, the behavior that is
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 8 Book Notes

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12 May 2011
19
Respondent behaviours are controlled by antecedent stimuli, and respondent conditioning involves the manipulation of antecedent stimuli. Respondent con
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 7 Book Notes

OC62145 Page
12 May 2011
14
The effects of reinforcement, extinction, and punishment are situation-specific. A behaviour occurs in situations in which it has been reinforced in th
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

PSYB45H3 Chapter Notes - Chapter 6: Reinforcement

OC62147 Page
12 May 2011
20
Punishment cannot be defined by whether the consequences appears unfavourable or aversive. Example carlton was riding his bike and looking down at the
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 5 Book Notes

OC62144 Page
12 May 2011
18
Once the behaviour is no longer reinforced, it often increases briefly in frequency, duration, or intensity, before it decreases and stops. Example whe
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 4 Book Notes

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12 May 2011
17
Defining reinforcement: when a behaviour results in a favourable outcome, that behaviour is more likely to be repeated in the future. Skinner emphasize
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 3 Book Notes

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12 May 2011
20
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 2 Book Notes

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12 May 2011
14
There are two types of behavioural assessment, direct and indirect. The steps for observing and recording the target behaviour include: defining the ta
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

Behaviour Modficiation - Chapter 1 Book Notes

OC62146 Page
12 May 2011
19
The characteristics that define behaviour include: behaviour is what people do and say, described with action verbs, not a static characteristics of th
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UTSCPSYB45H3Zachariah CampbellSummer

PSYB45H3 Chapter Notes - Chapter 13: Reinforcement

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12 May 2011
19
 conduct a functional assessment of why jacob engages in problem behaviour. Function of problem behaviours: social positive reinforcement.  delivered
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UTSCMGTA02H3Chris BovairdSummer

Chapter 5 Notes

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11 May 2011
20
Issues reflect the values, beliefs, and ideas that form the fabric of canadian society today. We continue to insist on a greener canada, we have seen t
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UTSCGGRA03H3Charles HSummer

Chapter 4 Notes

OC62144 Page
11 May 2011
21
The first urban revolution began over 6,000 years ago with the first cities in mesopotamia. These new cities were reflections of concentrated social po
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UTSCGGRA03H3Charles HSummer

Chapter 2 Notes

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11 May 2011
21
Chapter 2: environmental issues in cities a brief h istory. Began as a shift from t ribal communities and villages to larger, more complex, social, eco
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UTSCGGRA03H3Charles HSummer

GGRA03H3 Chapter Notes - Chapter 7: Cuyahoga River

OC62148 Page
11 May 2011
34
Two main water issues: contamination and ensuring the supply of clean water. One of the major reforms to the industrial city of the 19th century was th
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UTSCANTA01H3R SongSummer

Chapter 3 Notes

OC62149 Page
11 May 2011
26
Are a number of hypotheses to account for the origin of the universe. In the very beginning all the energy, space, and matter of known universe were co
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UTSCANTA01H3R SongSummer

Chapter 2 Notes

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11 May 2011
24
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UTSCANTA01H3R SongSummer

Chapter 4 Notes

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11 May 2011
30
The entire human genome has been sequenced as of spring 2003. We still need to discover how the dna builds an organism. Most of the genome is not compo
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UTSCANTA01H3R SongSummer

Chapter 2 Notes

OC62145 Page
11 May 2011
34
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