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MCMASTERGEOG 2UI3Robert WiltonFall

GEOG 2UI3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 13: Reward System, Housing Tenure

OC9194713 Page
18 Apr 2016
26
1. how do neighbourhood"s change: aging of physical environment. Style: e. g. architecture trends: social and demographic change in place. Some origina
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MCMASTERGEOG 2UI3Robert WiltonFall

GEOG 2UI3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 12: Ernest Burgess, Transnationality, Family Reunification

OC9194714 Page
18 Apr 2016
12
Children in affluent neighborhoods are getting roughly (per students) just in fundraisers alone. Children who live in lower income neighborhoods, whos
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MCMASTERGEOG 2UI3Robert WiltonFall

GEOG 2UI3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 11: Food Desert

OC9194714 Page
18 Apr 2016
21
Patterns of residential differentiation stem from the dynamics of urban social interaction that develops within the structural frame works of socio-eco
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MCMASTERGEOG 2UI3Robert WiltonFall

GEOG 2UI3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 10: Infrastructure Canada, Edge City, Mass Production

OC9194714 Page
18 Apr 2016
20
Lecture 10- transitions: metropolitan form: 1920-1945 suburban infilling. U. s. 1900: 470,000 cars 1930: 27 million. 1916 us federal aid roads act (a p
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MCMASTERGEOG 2UI3Robert WiltonFall

GEOG 2UI3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 9: Commuter Town, Transnationalism

OC9194713 Page
18 Apr 2016
23
Increasing fragmentation of economic, social and material fabric of cities. Some groups, neighborhoods and cities are strongly connected to flows of in
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MCMASTERGEOG 2UI3Robert WiltonFall

GEOG 2UI3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 8: Sun Belt, United States House Committee On Oversight And Government Reform, Federal Housing Administration

OC9194713 Page
18 Apr 2016
16
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MCMASTERGEOG 2UI3Robert WiltonFall

GEOG 2UI3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 7: Commuter Town, Bourgeoisie, Social Geography

OC9194715 Page
18 Apr 2016
27
There is a growing population of urban residents. This is partly due to transportation reasons. People mainly walked on foot to get from one place to a
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MCMASTERGEOG 2UI3Robert WiltonFall

GEOG 2UI3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 6: Natural Resource, Steam Engine

OC9194717 Page
18 Apr 2016
17
Lecture 6: foundations- the canadian urban system: frontier urbanization (1500"s-1780"s) In 1600, the numerous french settlements along the northeast c
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MCMASTERGEOG 2UI3Robert WiltonFall

GEOG 2UI3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 5: Charleston, New York, Gateway Cities

OC9194715 Page
18 Apr 2016
15
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MCMASTERGEOG 2UI3Robert WiltonFall

GEOG 2UI3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 4: Water Pollution, Market (Place), Merchant Capitalism

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18 Apr 2016
12
Agriculture: it expanded so largely that a large amount of people were needed and had roles to fulfill. Having political/religious aspects in life crea
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MCMASTERGEOG 2UI3Robert WiltonFall

GEOG 2UI3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 3: Harappa, Chichen Itza, Luoyang

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18 Apr 2016
24
Geography 2ui3 lecture 3- from babylon to bombay: questions to consider. Most were not solely concerned with food producion. 3: public wealth (emergenc
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MCMASTERGEOG 2UI3Robert WiltonFall

GEOG 2UI3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 2: International Political Economy, Neoliberalism, Dialectic

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18 Apr 2016
28
Geog 2ui3: monday september 15, 2014 lecture 2 urbanization part 2. Transition from pre- industrial (mercantile) to early industrial economy. Corporate
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MCMASTERGEOG 2UI3Robert WiltonFall

GEOG 2UI3 Lecture 1: Lecture 1-2UI3

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18 Apr 2016
18
Geog 2ui3: tuesday september 9, 2014 lecture 1 conceptualizing. Origin of word: from latin urbs --walled town or city. Population density of at 400 peo
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