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Final

BESC1120 Study Guide - Final Guide: Intentionality, Scientific Method, Pubic Hair

2 Pages
53 Views
Fall 2018

Department
Behavioural Science
Course Code
BESC1120
Professor
b
Study Guide
Final

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1
EXAM NOTES - Developmental Psychology
1. - Adolescence begins around age 12
- lasts until aprox age 20, is a developmental transition between childhood and adulthood.
- The extension of education during late 19th century and abolition of child labour helped to create
this period of transition
2. - Significant increases in height and weight around age 12-14
- boys a little later than girls. Large individual differences in timing of teen growth spurt, later
growth spurt in boys is responsible for enduring sex differences in adult height and weight.
- Body shape becomes differentiated in boys and girls by differential fat and muscle development
resulting in conformity to adult masculine and feminine body shapes.
3. - Puberty consist of the changes in sex organs and related parts of body that signal sexual maturity
and ability to reproduce.
- Stimulated by increased production of sex hormones (androgens) particularly testosterone and
oestrogen.
- In boys, rapid growth of penis and scrotum and production of fertile sperm.
- In girls, marked by menarche (first period).
- Both sexes exhibit secondary sex characteristics, eg breast development in girls and beard growth
in boys, pubic hair for box sexes.
4. - Wide individual differences in timing of puberty, as well as cultural differences and historical
variations.
- Occurs within a fairly narrow developmental window, suggesting a strong biogentic factor, but
environmental influences particularly proportion of body fat may vary timing within this window.
- For boys, early maturation tends to be negative with greater chance of behavioural and
psychological problems in short term.
- Late maturation for boys ma have short term negatives in peer relationships but in long term
usually better outcomes.
- For girls, early maturation exposes them to psychological and health risks including inappropriate
sexual relationships, STI’s, teen pregnancy – short term, Long term may be more positive
- late maturing girls tend to be protected from early sexualisation and are generally better adjusted
than early maturers
5. - Are a high-risk group for injury and death due to risky behaviours and beliefs of invulnerability.
– major health threats include exposure to STIs, substance abuse (incl. Recreational drug use,
drinking and smoking), obesity and eating disorders.
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Description
1 EXAM NOTES Developmental Psychology 1. Adolescence begins around age 12 lasts until aprox age 20, is a developmental transition between childhood and adulthood. The extension of education during late 19 century and abolition of child labour helped to create this period of transition 2. Significant increases in height and weight around age 1214 boys a little later than girls. Large individual differences in timing of teen growth spurt, later growth spurt in boys is responsible for enduring sex differences in adult height and weight. Body shape becomes differentiated in boys and girls by differential fat and muscle development resulting in conformity to adult masculine and feminine body shapes. 3. Puberty consist of the changes in sex organs and related parts of body that signal sexual maturity and ability to reproduce. Stimulated by increased production of sex hormones (androgens) particularly testosterone and oestrogen. In boys, rapid growth of penis and scrotum and production of fertile sperm. In girls, marked by menarche (first period). Both sexes exhibit secondary sex characteristics, eg breast development in girls and beard growth in boys, pubic hair for box sexes. 4. Wide individual differences in timing of puberty, as well as cultural differences and historical variations. Occurs within a fairly narrow developmental window, suggesting a strong biogentic factor, but environmental influences particularly proportion of body fat may vary timing within this window. For boys, early maturation tends to be negative with greater chance of behavioural and psychological problems in short term. Late maturation for boys ma have short term negatives in peer relationships but in long term usually better outcomes. For girls, early maturation exposes them to psychological and health risks including inappropriate sexual relationships, STIs, teen pregnancy short term, Long term may be more positive late maturing girls tend to be protected from early sexualisation and are generally better adjusted than early maturers 5. Are a highrisk group for injury and death due to risky behaviours and beliefs of invulnerability. major health threats include exposure to STIs, substance abuse (incl. Recreational drug use, drinking and smoking), obesity and eating disorders.
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