Asexual Reproduction Essay Notes

3 Pages
104 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biological Sciences
Course
BISC 102
Professor
Logan M.
Semester
Summer

Description
Organisms exhibit a variety of patterns relative to reproduction, and different points of view may be taken with  regard to classification of these patters. For our purposes, we shall consider that there are two basic types of  reproduction, sexual and asexual. Sexual reproduction is always associated with a type of nuclear division called meiosis which occurs at some  point in the life cycle of the organism involved. Furthermore, except for a few atypical cases, sexual reproduction is characterized by the union of gametes, or  specialized reproductive cells, in the formation of a new individual. Such gametic union is followed by the  fusion of the game tic nuclei and the association of their chromosomes: this entire sequence of events is known  as fertilization. The two most significant features of sexual reproduction at least in terms of our emphasis in this chapter, are  meiosis and chromosomal association, mostly because of their genetic implications. It is sufficient for our  purposes to regard any process in which there is the production of organisms without the formation so new  chromosomal associations as asexual reproduction. The vast majority of organisms exhibit sexuality, a phenomenon which, in its most obvious form, becomes  apparent in the most obvious form, becomes apparent in the existence of two sexually distinct kinds" of  individuals within a species. Typically, the two cells which meet and unite in sexual reproduction are morphologically dissimilar, one being  relatively large and non­motile, the other being relatively small and motile. When this is the case, the larger  gamete is termed an egg or ovum, and the smaller one is called a sperm. Whenever an individual is capable of  producing sperm it is designated a male; if it produces eggs, it is a female. The major exceptions to this typical manifestation of sexuality are extremely interesting. Among several of the  algae and fungi, there are two sexually distinct strains within a species that are morphologically  indistinguishable in every detail. Sexual reproduction is carried on through the union of gametes, but there is  no discernible structural difference between them. Because there is no basis for designating one of the strains  "male" and the other "female", it is common to refer to one as the "plus" strain and the other as the "minus"  strain in a completely arbitrary manner. Certain protozoa exhibit a phenomenon called multiple sexuality, in which there are various levels of sex rather  than two contrasting forms or strains. In multiple sexuality, the concepts of maleness and femaleness are, of  course, entirely without meaning. Although most species of animals are dioeciously, some are monoecious. In general, the most complex animals  are dioeciously, whereas the monoecious conditions are limited to the less complex forms. An individual  member of a monoecious species is called a hermaphrodite the common earthworm is such an animal. It is  interesting to note that dioecious species an individual may occasionally be seen which possesses certain  characteristics of both sexes. Such an individual is called a pseudohermaphrodite. Such an individual is not functional both as a male and a female as is a true hermaphrodite, and its appearance  in the species is considered abnormal. In plants, sexuality is generally obscured to such a degree as to render it  virtually unknown to the casual observer. Nevertheless, most plant species feature sexual reproduction. In  contrast to the situation among animals, the more complex plant species tend to be monoecious rather than  dioecious, although these terms have a slightly different meaning in botany. In dioeciously organisms, cross fertilization occurs of necessity. However, in monoecious organisms, a  possibility exists for self­fertilization. This is seldom realized in monoecious animals, because most  hermaphrodites produce eggs and sperm at different times. In monoecious plants, self­fertilization is common,  but even so, cross­ fertilization is the rule. Few species fail to exhibit sexuality in some form, but in spite of this, asexual reproduction is very widespread  in the world of life. Many organisms reproduce most of the time in this manner, with sexual reproduction  occurring rarely or occasionally. In general, asexual reproduction is limited in the animal kingdom to certain members of the lowest phyla in the  scale of complexity, notably the Protozoa, Porifera, Cnidaria, and Platyhelminthes, of the phyla we have  considered as major ones. In the plant kingdom, however some of the most advanced plants reproduce in this  fashion with regularity. Fundamentally, there are two ways in which asexual reproduction may occur. The first method might be  termed somatic reproduction, the essence of which is the production of a new individual from a part of the  parental body. This form of reproduction involves more t
More Less

Related notes for BISC 102

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit