Study Guides (248,151)
Canada (121,346)
CHST 1000 (13)
Midterm

PHIL1301 Mid term Exam Review.docx

4 Pages
139 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Child Studies
Course
CHST 1000
Professor
Nalini E Ramlakhan
Semester
Winter

Description
Example: Empiricism is the view that knowledge is obtained through sensory experience.  Some proponents of empiricism are John Locke, who thought that the mind was a blank  slate, and David Hume. This view is contrasted with rationalism and rationalists  philosophers, such as Descartes, who believed that knowledge is obtained through reason. th 6  Day movie ­relation to personal identity.  What philosophy is? It is the study of fundamental problems. Analytic Philosophy focuses on the analysis of  concepts. Continental Philosophy is more speculative, less focused on logic and  argumentation. There are many branches of philosophy including metaphysics,  epistemology, ethics, logic and esthetics. Dualism: The mind and the body are separate. Cartesian: Cartesian Dualism is the view that the mind and body are two distinct  substances that are intimately related. One proponent of Cartesian Dualism is Descartes,  who formulated the mind­body problem. In this view, mental states are non spatial and  qualitative. No one can observe your qualitative experiences, but they can observe your  brain state. For Plato, the mind is equivalent to the soul, the soul/mind is indivisible and  can live on after death of the body, distinct from the body and contains all true  knowledge.  Parallelism: Parallelism is the view that the mind (mental) and body (material) are two  distinct substances that only appear to interact, but do not. Proponent: Leibniz accepts the  view of the world being divided into two distinct substances.  God intervenes to ensure  that mental and material sequences run in parallel. ­ Seen as more advanced than  Cartesian Dualism, because it solves the problem of mind­body interaction Occasionalism: A variant of parallelism, Occasionalism says that mental and material  substances only appear to interact. One proponent of Occasionalism is Nicolas  Malebranche. Occasionalism makes God actively responsible for the existence and  character of event sequences. (ex. When you sit on a tack, God wills the occurrence of a  sensation of pain in your mind).  ­ Like Cartesian dualism and parallelism,  occasionalism runs into the issue of proving the existence of God, before we can accept  the theory that causal interaction between the mind and the body is an illusion Idealism: All that there is are mind and contents, no actual physical things. Most extreme  type is solipsism: the world is just a single mind and its contents. Proponent: Bishop  George Berkeley, think the physical is something unintelligible.  All experiences of  material objects and events are nothing more than elaborate and prolonged dreams or  hallucinations. It banishes problems associated with causal interaction between minds  and the material world.  Epiphenomenalism: The mind is a by­product of the brain. The brain can cause the mind  to exist, but not vice versa. You can’t explain mental to physical phenomenon. Mental  events are real and cannot cause material events. Material events cause mental events.  Mental events are ‘epiphenomena’ ­> incidental side effects of material phenomena.   Mental phenomena resemble smoke produced by a locomotive, or the shadow cast by a  billiard ball rolling across a billiard table, or the squeaking noise produced by a pair of  new shoes. One perk of epiphenomenalism is that it doesn’t bother with qualia. First, the  nature of material­to­mental causal relations is none too clear. The epiphenomenalist  contends that some material events cause mental events, but mental events cause nothing. Ockham’s Razor: (William of Ockham)­ When given competing theories (in this case,  theories of mind), if all theories can equally explain X, accept the theory that makes the  fewest commitments.  Materialism/Physicalism: The mind and body are the same.  Materials: Democritus and Hobbes.   Behaviorism:  Philosophical/logical behavior: deemed implausible. Main doctrine: Mental state is just a  disposition to behave a certain way. Having a mental state is just being disposed to  behavior.  Psychological/methodological: more plausible view. Skinner & Watson: thought that only  what is publicly observable is a fit topic of public inquiry. ­ Behaviorists look at what  organisms do in response to environmental contingencies. They objected to dualism  because they claimed that questions about the mind are scientifically irrelevant. Mental  states were taken to be private.  **Wittgenstein – Beetle in the Box analogy: How we should think of mental states.  Meant to depict the relation that we bear our own and others’ states of mind. Our states of  mind are private and only we have access to these states. “Beetle” stands for the object in  the box.
More Less

Related notes for CHST 1000

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit