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[FILM 1000] - Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam (27 pages long!)


Department
Film Studies
Course Code
FILM 1000
Professor
Andre Loiselle
Study Guide
Final

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Waterloo
FILM 1000
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Film – Week 3 Lecture – Sept. 27th – Classical Editing
Continuity Editing:
Whatever cut and match the editor makes, there must be a sense of continuity; continuity of
narrative, of action, of space and time.
Master shots and Inserts:
In classical Hollywood cinema, scenes are shot more than once (could be many), once for the
master shot which shows a large perspective of what’s going on, and then its shot again with
close-ups and middle shots on different characters and objects (for a detail or reaction shot). The
moving back and forth between these two scenes creates a dynamic that couldn’t be achieved
with just a master shot.
Scenes are also reshot from different angles, not shot all at the same time from different cameras.
This is done so that the lighting can be perfected for each angle.
Shot-reverse-shot: back and forth movement between characters or between characters and an
object, usually used in dialogue.
- Usually shows an “over-the-shoulder” camera position.
*People expect a reverse shot, and when the director decides to deny the shot, it makes people
anxious. (ex: in a horror movie when they don’t show you what the character sees)
Cut on Question: During a dialogue, a way to ensure continuity is through a shot-reverse-shot
cut according to “question-answer-question” (Character asks questions – Cut – Character
answers – Cut to reaction, etc.…)
Eye-line match:
To ensure continuity in “looks”, eyes if the characters looking are often in the same position on
screen as the eyes of the other character that’s being looked at, between cuts (in different shots)
Cut/Match on action:
To create visual dynamic without relying on “question” and without drawing attention to the cut
(classical Hollywood generally doesn’t want you to notice editing). Editors will cut in the middle
of a gesture or a movement, so movement between shots blends with the movement performed
by actor. (Something distracts you so you don’t notice the cut)
The 180-degree line: A technique that’s fundamental to mainstream Hollywood cinema.
Usually when films break this rule it’s on purpose. The technique is used to make sure that cuts
keep a continuous sense of space : an imaginary line is drawn between the camera and the action.
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The camera remains on its side for the master shot and all inserts, while the actors perform the
action on the other side.
Generally speaking, if you have a dialogue the camera will always be on the same side. (ex:
don’t switch side during a dialogue shot-revers-shot situation, one character always remains on
the left and the other, on the right).
Its sometimes necessary to cross the 180-degree line because characters move around. In this
situation editors must be more concerned with “cutting on question” or “cutting on action” to
make sure the line-crossing isn’t noticed.
Using a large, or surprising gesture is a good way to distract the audience while needed to cross
the 180 line. A broad gesture or a surprising statement are most effective in distracting the
audience in this situation. (Unless the filmmaker actually wants to confuse the audience, then the
180-degree line crossing can be used)
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