Study Guides (248,585)
Canada (121,629)
Law (393)
LAWS 2302 (32)
Final

Final Exam Review.docx

15 Pages
162 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Law
Course
LAWS 2302
Professor
Paolo Giancaterino
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 1 – Overview ­ 25% of Canadians are a victim of crime every year The Criminal Process ­ Starts with the decision of a legislature to make something illegal ­ The police then enforce the law ­ When an accused is charged, the trial process begins ­ If the accused pleas guilty, the judge will decide on a sentence ** See chart on p. 4 Sources of Criminal Law ­ The Constitution, which includes the division of powers and the Charter ­ Judge­made common law ­ The Constitution prevails over both statutes and common law, and statutes prevail over  common law ­ Courts play a prime role in interpreting the Constitution but court decisions can be  displaced by the enactment of a statute  ­ Statutes cannot displace anything in the Charter ­ An emerging source of criminal law may be international law  Criminal Offences ­ Criminal law is enacted solely by Parliament ­ Different offences protect different things (ex. the offence of sexual assault protects  bodily integrity) ­ The goal is to punish and deter inherently wrongful behaviour Regulatory Offences ­ Most offences are regulatory offences ­ They include traffic offences, environmental offences, health and safety regulations, etc. ­ They can be enacted by Parliament, provinces, or municipalities  ­ The punishment is usually a fine, but may include imprisonment ­ Used to deter risky behaviour and prevent harm before it happens Chapter 2 – The Criminal Law and the Constitution ­ The Constitution was enacted in 1867 ­ The Charter was added in 1982 which placed restrictions on the state’s ability to enact  and apply criminal law The Division of Powers ­ The Constitution set out federal and provincial powers (s. 91 & 92) ­ Ultra vires: the division of government is acting outside their scope of jurisdiction ­ It is within the power of the federal government to enact criminal law and enact laws  that facilitate criminal law ­ A provincial law will be found unconstitutional if it is found to have a purpose of  punishing criminal behaviour ­ Both the provinces and the federal government can establish police forces to enforce the  Criminal Code ­ The provinces have jurisdiction over those sentenced to provincial facilities (under 2  years) and the federal government has jurisdiction over those in federal penitentiaries  (over 2 years) ­ The majority of criminal cases are resolved in provincial courts ­ Only federally appointed Superior Court judges can sit with a jury The Court System ­ In Ontario, there are 4 main levels of court 1) Ontario Court of Justice (lowest) 2) Ontario Superior Court of Justice 3) Ontario Court of Appeal 4) Supreme Court of Canada (highest) ­ In the OCJ the trials are heard by a judge only ­ For indictable offences, there is the choice to be tried in the OCJ or the OSCJ ­ If the OSCJ is chosen, there will be a trial by jury ­ For murder cases, the only option is a trial by jury in the OSCJ ­ An appeal for a summary conviction goes to the OSCJ ­ An appeal for an indictable conviction goes to the OCA ­ An appeal can be made for the sentence, a mistake of fact, or a mistake of law Criminal Law and the Charter ­ Under s. 24, courts can provide a range of remedies if police, prosecutors, or prison  officials violate the Charter rights of the accused ­ Criminal laws can be struck down if they are found by the courts to violate the Charter  and the government cannot justify it under s. 1 ­ s. 7­13 are most commonly used in criminal law ­ R. v. Big M Drug Mart ­> freedom of religion Crime Investigations and the Charter ­ There is a level of responsibility for the police to act in a reasonable manner ­ s. 8 protects people from unreasonable search and seizure ­ s. 24(2) gives the court the power to discard any evidence that was gained through a  Charter breach ­ s. 9 protects people from an arbitrary detention or arrest  ­ RIDE programs are justified under s. 1 ­ Upon detention, police must inform the detainee that they have the right to  counsel under s. 10(b) ­ There are 3 aspects of 10(b): 1) Information: informing the detainee that they can get a lawyer 2) Implementation: giving the detainee reasonable time to do so 3) Holding off: no questioning until the detainee has spoken with a lawyer ­ Entrapment: police can go into a high crime area and do ‘random virtue testing’ ­ R. v. Amato: courts upheld the conviction even though the police officer  persistently solicited him and threatened violence Trials and the Charter ­ s. 7 protects disclosure and the right to make full answer ­ Disclosure: the obligation of the state to give the accused all of the relevant  evidence ­ There is no obligation for the accused to give the state any evidence ­ There are 2 exceptions to this: 1) The accused has to tell the Crown of an alibi defence so that it can be  investigated 2) Calling upon an expert witness must be disclosed ­ s. 11(b): The right to a trial within a reasonable time period ­ For it to violate the Charter the accused must show they suffered prejudice as a  result ­ If a trial isn’t heard in a reasonable amount of time, the judge has the power to  make remedies ­ s. 11(d): The right to be presumed innocent until proven guilty ­ The burden of proof always* falls on the Crown ­ The Crown must prove all elements of the crime beyond a reasonable doubt ­ s. 11(c): A person cannot be compelled to testify at their own trial or testify against  themselves Chapter 3 – The Prohibited Act, or Actus Reus  Codification of the Criminal Act ­ s. 9 of the Criminal Code states that no person shall be convicted of an offence unless  they do something that is prohibited ­ Strict and purposive construction of criminal law ­ The law should be interpreted strictly to the benefit of the accused (strict  doctrine) ­ R. v. McIntosh: a construction of self­defence that favours the liberty of the  accused instead of expanding the scope of liability ­ A law first should have a purposive reading and should only apply the strict  doctrine if there are still ambiguities  ­ R. v. Russell: first­degree murder can be committed even if the underlying  offence was committed against a third party (strict construction didn’t apply) ­ Marked departure and the de minimis defence ­ R. v. Gunning: careless use of a firearm must have a marked departure from the  reasonable standard of care ­ “de minimis non curat lex”: the law shouldn’t punish a ‘mere trifle’ ­ the de minimis defence hasn’t yet been accepted as a defence by the majority of  the Seupreme Court ­ Unconstitutionally vague and overbroad laws violate s. 7 of the Charter ­ R. v. Heywood: the Supreme Court struck down the provision that someone  convicted of a sexual offence cannot be around child playgrounds because it was  too broad ­ Ignorance of the law: R. v. Malis: Supreme Court held that ignorance of the law is no  excuse ­ But mistake of fact is a defence  ­ A person may not be convicted if the fault element required some knowledge of  the relevant law ­ Officially induced error: where the accused took reasonable steps to ensure they  were following the law and results in a stay of proceedings Actus Reus and Criminal Liability ­ As long as a person had intent at some point while committing the crime they are liable ­ R. v. Meli: the accused struck the victim then threw him off a cliff where he died due to  exposure and Meli was still convicted ­ Even if the prohibited consequence is only due to the accused’s action in part, they are  still liable ­ The causation element must be established beyond a reasonable doubt ­ R. v. Williams: acquitted of aggravated assault for possibly infecting a woman with HIV  because they could not pin point whom gave her the disease ­ The failure to do something can produce liability when there is an obligation to do so ­ We will not punish a person for failing to act unless they have a legal duty to do so  (omissions) Chapter 4 – Unfulfilled Crimes and Participation in Crimes Attempts ­ Often subject to less punishment, usually half ­ s. 463 sets out the punishment for attempts ­ The mens rea for attempted murder cannot be less than the specific intent to kill ­ The same mens rea is needed for fulfilled murders ­ The high requirement for the mens rea is because of the stigma attached to it ­ The minimum fault element is knowledge that death will result from your  actions ­ For other attempted offences, the mens rea is the specific intent to obtain the prohibited  result ­ Mere preparation is not the same as an attempt ­ Retreat can be a consideration because the intent was formed but then abandoned before  the crime was committed ­ A person can be held liable for a crime that could not have possibly been committed  (impossibility is not a defence) Conspiracy ­ The Crown only has to prove a meeting of the minds in regard to a common design to  do something unlawful ­ The actus reus is an agreement to carry out the offence ­ There needs to be proof that there was a meeting of the minds, and once that  agreement is complete, the actus reus is fulfilled ­ The mens rea is the intention to agree and the intention to carry out the common design ­ Anyone who encourages the crime may also be a party to conspiracy Counselling ­ Counselling a crime that is not committed is when a person attempts to solicit another  person into committing a crime where the person doesn’t agree to commit the offence ­ The actus reus requires procuring, soliciting, or inducing someone to commit an  offence ­ The mens rea requires subject of knowledge of the crime counselled and intent  that the crime be performed ­ Counselling a crime that is committed is when the person being solicited proceeds to  perform the prohibited act ­ Both parties are subject to the same punishment Aiding and Abetting ­ s. 21(1) of the Criminal Code states that anyone is a party to an offence if they actually  commit the offence or if they aid or abet the offence ­ Aiding: helping someone commit an offence ­ Abetting: encouraging, instigating or promoting someone to commit a crime  ­ It is different from aiding because there is no involvement in the actual offence ­ R. v. Dunlop: just because a person is at the scene of the crime does not make them an  aider or abetter  ­ The mens rea requires knowledge of the type, but not the exact nature of the crime ­ Common intention: forming a common intention to carry out the unlawful purpose ­ The actus reus requires a formation of the common intention to assist each other  in the unlawful purpose ­ The mens rea requires that the accused knew or ought to have known a crime  would be the outcome of the common intention ­ Accessory after the fact: receiving, comforting or hiding a person who has committed a  crime in order for them to escape ­ The mens rea requires subject knowledge that the person has committed an  offence and the intention to help the accused Chapter 5 – The Fault Element, or Mens Rea Mens Rea ­ The fault element must relate to the consequences of the act ­ The fault element is inferred ­ The subjective fault element requires the Crown to establish that the accused  subjectively had acquired knowledge about the consequences of the crime ­ Serves to protect the morally innocent ­ There are 3 considerations when determining the mens rea for certain crimes: 1) The stigma attached to it (the greater the stigma, the higher the requirements) 2) Whether the punishment is proportionate to the crime 3) The idea that causing harm intentionally are more at fault than those who cause harm  unintentionally  ­ Where there is an absence of legislation on what the fault element is, the courts favour  subjective mens rea Subjective Mens Rea ­ Intent, purpose, of wilfulness ­ Acts as a doctrine that prevents the conviction of someone who is incapable of  knowledge and foresight that reasonable person would have ­ Knowledge ­> A person is guilty of murder if they know that they are likely to cause  death with their actions ­ Wilful blindness: knowing blocking out information ­ Recklessness: occurs if a person has adverted to or become aware of the risk of the  prohibited conduct but proceeds anyways Objective Mens Rea ­ Requires that a reasonable person in the accused’s position would have required the  guilty knowledge or acted differently ­ Negligence: conduct that amounts to a marked departure from that of a reasonable  person Mistake of Fact ­ Mistakes relating to the degree of fault ­ The Crown will be unable to prove the fault element if the accused honestly believed  that what they were doing was lawful Chapter 6 – Regulatory Offences and Corporate Crime Regulatory offences ­ Enacted by federal, provincial or municipal government. ­ They serve to protect the public and the regulatory interests of the state ­ Often apply to corporations that have engaged in harmful conduct (ex. pollution) ­ When using the defence of negligence there does not need to be a marked departure  from the reasonable standard of care  ­ When charging a corporation with a regulatory offence there must be someone within  the corporation who is at fault and their fault must be proved by the Crown beyond a  reasonable doubt ­ In 2003 Parliament introduced reforms that made it easier to convict corporations for  criminal offences ­ The ‘directing mind’, which was restricted to those who had enough power to  establish corporate policy, was replaced by ‘senior officer’, which includes  anyone who is responsible for managing an important aspect of the organizations  activities Absolute Liability Offences ­ Requires the Crown to prove the commission of the act beyond a reasonable doubt but  not the fault element ­ These offences may persuade organizations to take additional measures to prevent the  prohibited act, but may also punish the morally innocent ­ R. v. Pierce Fisheries Ltd.: the possession of undersized lobsters, which is contrary to  regulations, was an absolute liability offence  ­ Recognized that regulatory offences don’t carry the same stigma as criminal  offences and it would be difficult to prove subjective fault  ­ The Supreme Court has decided that it would not treat regulatory offences as absolute  liability unless the legislation has indicated so ­ ex. The court decided that pollution was strict liability ­ The accused will have an opportunity to provide proof of due diligence, mistake  of fact, etc.  ­ ex. The BC Motor Vehicle Reference stated that driving with a suspended  license was absolute liability and therefore the courts treat it as such ­ The courts held that absolute liability offences would violate the Charter “only if and to  the extent that it has the potential of depriving life, liberty and security of the person” ­ An absolute liability offence is not likely to violate the Charter unless a prison sanction  is provided ­ In Hess, the courts found that the crime of statutory rape, which was an absolute  liability offence, violated S. 7 of the Charter and that the defendant should be given the  opportunity to prove that they took all reasonable steps to ensure that the girl was not  under 14 years of age ­ Corporations have ‘automatic primary responsibility’ for ALO’s ­ It attributes the act of employee’s to the entire corporation  ­ The defences of automatism, necessity, mental disorder, or extreme intoxication might  apply to an ALO Strict Liability Offences ­ The blameworthiness of a SLO is negligence ­ The Crown doesn’t need to prove the fault element, but the accused is able to provide a  defence  ­ This is on a balance of probabilities ­ If a person took all reasonable care before committing the offence then they are  not liable ­ The reasonableness of the accused’s conduct should be attributed to the  circumstances that the person would have seen rather than what the circumstances  actually were ­ In the case against Wholesale Travel Group, the court upheld that negligence was a  sufficient fault element ­ Once the Crown has proved beyond a reasonable doubt that the act occurred, then  negligence is presumed  ­ Due diligence requires an active and reasonable attempt to prevent the commission of  the prohibited act Vicarious Liability ­ Occurs when the acts and fault of another person are attributed to the accused for the  purpose of determining liability ­ Used in tort law as a means of ensuring that employers are not allowed to profit from  civil wrongs committed by their employees  ­ Bhatnager v. Canada: The Supreme Court suggested that vicarious liability might  violate s. 7 of the Charter  ­ Courts are divided on this issue ­ Exhausts the range of due diligence defences that a person would normally have  because the actions were out of their control/consent ­ It is seen as an absolute liability offence because the person may be convicted  but are not at fault Corporations and Mens Rea Offences ­ The senior official acts as the directing mind of the organization the fault of a crime is  attributed to that person ­ A corporation cannot claim ignorance of the act or that they warned not to commit the  prohibited act ­ An exception in when the directing mind committed fraud, in which the corporation  would be the victim and the individual would be held responsible ­ The corporation might still be
More Less

Related notes for LAWS 2302

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit