Study Guides (248,454)
Canada (121,562)
PSCI 1100 (34)
Final

Democracy Exam Review

5 Pages
56 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
PSCI 1100
Professor
Tamara Kotar
Semester
Fall

Description
Democracy is a system of government in which a country’s political leaders are chosen by the people in fair elections;  and can be fully defined as political power exercised either directly or indirectly through participation, competition, and  liberty. • Direct democracy: public participates directly in governance and policy making • Indirect democracy: public participates indirectly through its elected representatives o Referendum: a ballot – allows public to make a more direct decision about policy o Initiative: citizens collect signatures together to put a question to a national vote • Origins: Early Greek democracies provided the foundation for the concept of public participation where the  people were the state. The Roman Empire laid out the concept of republicanism that emphasized the separation  of powers within a state and the representation of the public through elected officials. Greece gave the idea of  popular sovereignty and Rome gave the notion of legislative bodies; they were intertwined and produced  modern liberal democracy. • Quality: Not all democracies are made the same, but it is the most fundamental system in which political  power resides in the people. • Popular democracy: freedom of expression, right to vote, free/fair elections • Constitutional democracy: institutional limits on good government and executive authority, guarantee of  individual and collective rights, checks and balances Components • Representative: liberal idea, the part of the individual who has a right but not obligated to, idea of protecting  individuals (ensuring leaders are bound by the rule of law), exaggeration of individual preferences, boundaries  on the social  • Civil society: idea that people should be able to deliberate amongst themselves, independence from those who  govern them, act as a check on government, autonomous from the state – organized life outside of the state • Citizenship: participation in daily life ­ someone who is allowed to participate, happens to those who don’t  realize full citizenship or are not treated as full citizens o Trains people to participate • Procedures: There are procedural norms required by democracy. If you just meet the requirements, e.g. secret  ballot in election every four years, and it’s relatively open, etc. That doesn’t necessarily meet the liberal  democracy standards. It’s the minimum requirements needed.   o Frequent, fair elections, right to free expression, access to alternative sources of information, control  over government decisions vested in elected officials, citizens should have independent organizations  and associations Institutions of the Democratic State: • Executive: the branch that carries out the laws and policies of a state o Head of state: a role that symbolizes and represents the people, both nationally and internationally,  embodying and articulating the goals of the regime – Monarch or president o Head of government: deals with the everyday tasks of running the state, such as formulating and  executing domestic policy, alongside a cabinet of ministers who are charged with specific policy  areas (education or agriculture) o Usually referred to as Prime Ministers o Distinction is between policy management and international and symbolic functions • Legislature is typically views as the body in which national politics is considered and debated o Bicameral systems are legislatures that contain two houses (majority of liberal democracies)  Traced back to England and other European states  Served the interests of two economic classes o Unicameral systems are those with one house (small countries) • Judiciaries and Judicial Review are the third major institution central to liberal democracies o Rule of law: the sovereignty of law over the people and elected officials o Judicial institutions are important components in upholding law and maintaining its adherence to the  constitution o Constitutional court: determines the constituently of laws and acts o Judicial review: courts can review the actions of government and overturn those that violate the  constitution  Varies from country to country  Vary in powers and how those powers are used  Concrete review: courts can consider the constitutionality of legislation when this question  has been triggered by a specific court case
More Less

Related notes for PSCI 1100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit