Study Guides (248,402)
Canada (121,510)
Psychology (776)
PSYC 2002 (22)
Midterm

PSYC 2002 - Hypothesis Testing.doc

8 Pages
117 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 2002
Professor
John Logan
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYC/NEUR 2002 Introduction to statistics in psychology Winter 2014 W­4 Readings ■ Introduction to hypothesis testing ▲NH pp. 145­170 (Hypothesis testing with z tests) Lecture Outline – Hypothesis testing ■ Z­scores & the normal table ■ steps in hypothesis testing ■ errors in hypothesis testing ■ alpha levels ■ evaluation of hypothesis ■ using Z­scores for hypothesis testing (Z­test) Normal distribution table: Z­table ■ area under the normal curve between specific points that corresponds to a proportion has been calculated and placed in a  table ■ in NH the table is located in Appendix B, Table B.1 (p. B1­B3) Normal distribution table   Z    % mean to Z    % in tail 0.00        0.00            50.00 0.01        0.40            49.60 0.02        0.80            49.20 0.03        1.20            48.80 0.04        1.60            48.40 0.05        1.99            48.01 0.06        2.39            47.61 0.07        2.79            47.21 0.08        3.19            46.81 ...             ...                ... Normal distribution table ■ as values in column Z increase, values in column “% MEAN TO Z” increase (values in “% IN TAIL” column decrease) ■ proportions can be used to calculate probabilities above or below a specific Z­score or between two Z­scores Normal distribution table using the table to calculate probabilities/proportions ■ draw a diagram to aid your thinking ■ find the probability or proportion that corresponds to the Z­score (above, below or between specific Z­scores) Examples using the normal distribution table example 1 ■ what percentage of a normal distribution is associated with a Zscore above .24? .24 Examples using the normal distribution table example 1 (continued) 1. look up .24 in column Z 2. find value in “% TAIL” column corresponding to .24 → 40.52% Examples using the normal distribution table example 2 ■ what is the percentage of the normal distribution associated with a Z­score less than ­.24? ­.24 Examples using the normal distribution table example 2 (continued) 1. normal distribution is symmetrical so negative and positive Z­scores have the same percentages associated with them ­.24 .24 Examples using the normal distribution table example 2 (continued) 2. look up .24 in column Z 3. find value in “% TAIL” column corresponding to .24 → 40.52% Examples using the normal distribution table example 3 ■ what is the percentage of the normal distribution associated with a Z­score below .24? .24 Examples using the normal distribution table example 3 (continued) 1. this requires the determination of two percentages: the percentage less than 0 and the percentage between 0 and .24 Examples using the normal distribution table example 3 (continued) 2. look up .24 in column Z 3. to obtain the percentage between 0 and .24 find the value in “% Mean to Z” column corresponding to .24 → 9.48% 4. the percentage less than 0 = 50% 5. 9.48% + 50% = 59.48% Examples using the normal distribution table example 4 what is the proportion of the normal distribution associated with Z­scores between .24 and 1.2? Examples using the normal distribution table example 4 (continued) 1. this requires the determination of two percentages: the percentage between the mean and .24 and the percentage between  the mean and 1.2 & then taking the difference between these percentages Examples using the normal distribution table example 4 (continued) 2. look up .24 in column Z 3. to obtain the percentage between . 24 and the mean find the value in the “% Mean to Z” column corresponding to .24 →  9.48% Examples using the normal distribution table example 4 (continued) 4. do the same for a z­score of 1.2 → 38.49% 5. the proportion of the normal distribution associated with Z­scores between .24 and 1.2 is 38.49% ­ 9.48% = 29.01% Normal distribution table: Percentiles to Z ■ percentiles can be used to determine the original raw score associated with the percentile ▲use table to look up value of Z associated with a percentile ▲ then use inverse Z­score formula to determine raw score  X = Z (SD) +M A simple definition of hypothesis testing ■ hypothesis testing is a statistical procedure in which sample data are used make an inference about the likelihood of a  research hypothesis concerning a population Hypothesis testing: Basic steps 1. generate hypotheses about a population that receives a treatment and a population that does not receive a treatment 2. set decision criterion: how big a difference between treatment and no­treatment groups is necessary to say the treatment  sample is different from the no­treatment group 3. obtain random sample from treatment population 4. compare sample data (treatment) to population data (no treatment) using criterion & make a decision Hypothesis testing: Basic steps ■ note that the number of steps in NH is six; I have omitted two of NH’s steps ▲ Step 1: “Identify the populations to be compared, the comparison distribution, the appropriate  test, and its  assumptions.” ▲ Step 3: “...state the relevant characteristics of the comparison distribution...” Hypothesis testing: Basic steps ■ why did I omit NH steps 1 & 3? ▲ simplify the HT procedure ▲much of the content of steps 1 & 3 is implicit in the other steps ■ you can use either the 4­step procedure (which I will use in the remainder of the course) or the NH 6­ step procedure Hypothesis testing: Probability ■ hypothesis testing does not guarantee with 100% certainty that the decision is correct, however ■ hypothesis testing only indicates that the decision is likely true Typical hypothesis testing scenarios example 1 ■ mean weight of Canadians = 70 kg ■ obtain sample from population N = 200 ■ measure weight of 200 individuals; is the average weight of the sample the same or different from that hypothesized for the  population? Typical hypothesis testing scenarios example 2 ■ evaluate a drug as a potential cold cure; operationalize by saying that drug will eliminate all symptoms of cold within 24 hours  of taking the drug ■ hypothesis is that the population of all those with a cold will have no cold symptoms within 24 hours of taking the drug while  the population of those with colds who do not take the drug will continue to have cold symptoms Typical hypothesis testing scenarios example 2 (con’t.) ■ obtain sample of 100 individuals ▲50 take drug ▲50 do not take drug ■ do the symptoms disappear in the sample as hypothesized? Typical hypothesis testing scenarios example 3 ■ memory enhancement procedure; all those who use the procedure will increase the number of items they can retain  compared to those who don’t use the procedure Typical hypothesis testing scenarios example 3 (con’t.) ■ hypothesis is that the population of all those that use the procedure will retain more information than the population of those  who do not use the procedure ■ obtain a sample of 50 individuals and randomly assign them to two groups, 25 individuals who learn the procedure and 25  individuals who don't; both groups learn a list of words and then are tested Typical hypothesis testing scenarios example 3 (con’t.) ■ does the memory enhancement group recall more words than the control group, as hypothesized for their respective populations? Hypothesis testing: Sample size ■ as in examples 1–3, researchers normally use a sample of several individuals ■ why? …the larger the sample, the more likely that sample characteristics will reflect population characteristics (it is possible to  do hypothesis testing with a sample size of n=1, but it is seldom done) ■ sample sizes > 1 require use of SE (σM) Step 1 in hypothesis testing: Hypotheses generation ■ hypothesis testing actually requires the generation of two hypotheses ▲null hypothesis ▲alternative (or research) hypothesis ■ each hypothesis is mutually exclusive ▲each defines a unique situation that together encompass all possible outcomes Step 1 in hypothesis testing: Null hypothesis (H0) ■ the null hypothesis states that no difference exists between the population that receives the treatment and the population that  does not receive the treatment ■ in the simplified version of hypothesis testing, only 1 individual from the population that receives the treatment will be  compared to the population that does not receive the treatment Step 1 in hypothesis testing: Alternative hypothesis (H1) ■ the alternative/research hypothesis states that a difference exists between the population that receives the treatment and the  population that does not receive the treatment. Step 1 in hypothesis testing: H0 & H1 example ­ a memory enhancement procedure produces a change in the recall of words ▲ H0: μ recall for those who learn words using procedure = μ for those who do not use the  procedure ▲ H1: μ recall for those who learn words using procedure ≠ μ for those who do not use the  procedure (Note that  μ, the symbol for the pop
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 2002

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit