Study Guides (248,357)
Canada (121,502)
Psychology (776)
PSYC 2002 (22)
Midterm

PSYC 2002 - T-test (dependent).doc

8 Pages
149 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 2002
Professor
John Logan
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYC/NEUR 2002 Introduction to statistics in psychology Winter 2014 Week 6 – February 12/14 Readings ■ Hypothesis testing with two sample means 1 ▲NH pp. 197­228 (The single­sample t test and paired­samples t test) Lecture Outline: t­test 1. problems with Z­test 2. t­test as a solution to Z­test problems 3. degrees of freedom & t­test 4. probabilities for t distributions 5. hypothesis testing w/ t­test for single samples 6. one­tailed single sample t­tests 7. assumptions of single samples t­test Lecture Outline: t­test 8. related samples t­test (aka repeated measures, paired, & matched samples) 9. formula for related samples t­test 10. hypothesis testing with related samples t­test 11. using t in confidence intervals 12. assumptions underlying related samples t­test 13. t­test & power Problems with Z­test basic ideas underlying Z­test 1.sample means approximate population means 2.standard error indicates how well a sample mean approximates a population mean Problems with Z­test 3.the difference between the data and the null hypothesis can be compared to the difference expected by chance; when the  difference between the data and the null hypothesis exceeds that expected by chance, the difference is said to be significant Problems with Z­test problem ■ Z­test procedure assumes more information is available then is typically available ■ population standard deviation is not usually known, therefore it is impossible to calculate the standard error associated  with a sample mean t­test as a solution to Z­test problems simple solution to problems with Z­test ■ use sample standard deviation to replace population standard deviation ■ Z­test is now transformed into t­test t­test as a solution to Z­test problems implications of using s instead of σ" ■ calculation of the sample standard deviation requires some modification from its population form ■ the SD of a sample is a biased estimate of the population SD t­test as a solution to Z­test problems ■ why is the SD of a sample biased? ▲ the sample’s variance is slightly smaller than the population’s variance ▲ therefore sample SD underestimates the population’s variance t­test as a solution to Z­test problems: Degrees of freedom ■ n­1 is used to compensate for the underestimation of the sampling error in the calculation of the sample standard deviation t­test as a solution to Z­test problems: Degrees of freedom ■ sample mean is used to calculate the sample standard deviation ■ use of the sample mean restricts the variability of the remaining scores ■ only n­1 scores in the sample are free to vary once the sample mean is known t­test as a solution to Z­test problems: Degrees of freedom ■ if n = 2 and M = 6, then the sum of the scores in the sample must be 12 ■ if one of the scores = 8, then a restriction is placed on the identity of the other score – it must be 4 ■ in this example there is n­1 or 1 degree of freedom (df). t­test as a solution to Z­test problems: When to use Z­test vs. t­test ■ if population standard deviation is known, use Z­test ■ if population standard deviation is unknown, use t­test Degrees of freedom & t­test ■ because the t­test uses sample standard deviation it must incorporate degrees of freedom into its usage ■ as df increases, the better the sample standard deviation s represents the population SD Degrees of freedom & t­test ■ increasing df produces essentially the same effect as increasing n ■ in turn, as the df increases, the more the t­statistic resembles the Z­statistic Degrees of freedom & t­test: tdistributions ■ t­distribution is similar to normal distribution, especially for large sample sizes ■ t­distribution is bell­shaped, symmetrical, and has a mean of zero Degrees of freedom & t­test: tdistributions ■ a separate t­distribution exists forevery df. Thus, there are a family of tdistributions. Probabilities for t distributions ■ probabilities associated with tdistributions are provided in table form in Appendix B­2 of NH ■ the probabilities in the table correspond to the cutoff sample tvalue (i.e., tcritical) required to reject the null hypothesis for  three levels of alpha: .10, .05, & .01 ■ critical values for both 1­ & 2­tailed tests are provided Probabilities for t distributions ■ determine df & then look up appropriate t­value associated with alpha level and one­ or two­tailed test Hypothesis testing w/ t­test for single samples procedure similar to Z­test 1.formulate hypotheses (μ) and set alpha level 2.locate critical region as defined by alpha and df (tcritical) 3.collect sample data and calculate test statistic (tobtained) 4.evaluate null hypothesis (compare tcritical and tobtained) & write conclusion Hypothesis testing w/ t­test for single samples: Example ■ test the hypothesis that extra handling of infants leads to a change in growth so that by the age of two years children who  have received extra handling will either weigh more or less than those children who do not receive extra handling Hypothesis testing w/ t­test for single samples: Example ■ collect data from a sample of 20 two year­old children, M = 31 lbs., SS = 16 lbs. ■ assume that you know that the average population weight of two year­old children is 26 lbs. Hypothesis testing w/ t­test for single samples: Example step 1: state hypothesis & select α" ■ H0: μhandling in infancy = 26 lbs. ■ H1: μhandling in infancy ≠ 26 lbs. ■ α = .05 for two tails Hypothesis testing w/ t­test for single samples: Example step 2: determine critical region ■ determine df ■ n = 20; df = n ­ 1 = 20 ­ 1 = 19 ■ α = .05 (split between two tails) ■ therefore critical region greater than t = +2.093 or less than t =­2.093 Hypothesis testing w/ t­test for single samples: Example step 3: calculate test statistic ■ M = 31 lbs.; SS = 16 S = .918 Sm = .205 Hypothesis testing w/ t­test for single samples: Example step 3 (continued): calculate test statistic t = 24.39 Hypothesis testing w/ t­test for single samples: Example step 4: evaluate null hypothesis ■ tobtained 24.390 > tcritical 2.093 ■ test statistic falls within the critical region; reject null hypothesis ■ handling makes a difference in the weight of children Hypothesis testing w/ t­test for single samples: Example step 4: evaluate null hypothesis ■ write concluding statement ▲The mean weight of infants who were handled (M = 31 lbs.) was significantly different from  the mean weight  of the population of infants who were not handled (μ = 26 lbs.), t(19) =  24.39, p  26 lbs. ■ α = .05 for one tail One­tailed t­tests: Example step 2: determine critical region ■ determine df ■ n = 20; df = n ­ 1 = 20 ­ 1 = 19 ■ α = .05 for one tail ■ therefore critical region greater than t = +1.729 One­tailed t­tests: Example step 3: calculate test statistic ■ M = 31 lbs.; SS = 16 ■ tobtained is the same as in previous twotailed example t = 24.39 One­tailed t­tests: Example step 4: evaluate null hypothesis ■ tobtained 24.390 > tcritical value 1.729 ■ test statistic falls within the critical region; reject null hypothesis ■ conclusion...handling increases the weight of children One­tailed t­tests: Example step 4: evaluate null hypothesis ■ write concluding statement ▲The mean weight of infants who were handled (M = 31 lbs.) was significantly more than the  mean weight of  the population of infants who were not handled (μ = 26 lbs.), t(19) = 24.39, p 
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 2002

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit