Study Guides (247,933)
Canada (121,177)
Biology (101)
BIOL 1010 (29)

digestive

12 Pages
65 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIOL 1010
Professor
gilliangass
Semester
Winter

Description
12/06/2013 DIGESTIVE SYSTEM (Chapter 25)   A. Introduction Digestion is the breaking down of larger food molecules into molecules that are small enough to enter body  cells; the organs that collectively form this function comprise the digestive system. B. Digestive Processes 1. The digestive system performs five major activities: i. ingestion (eating) ii. Propulsion­movement of food  along the gastrointestinal tract iii. digestion of food by both mechanical and chemical processes iv.  absorption of digested food molecules into the blood and lymph v. defecation of indigestible substances 2. Mechanical digestion includes: i. chewing of food by the teeth before it is swallowed ii. churning of food  by the smooth muscles of the stomach and small intestine so that it is thoroughly mixed with digestive  enzymes 3. Chemical digestion is a series of catabolic reactions in which enzymes break down large food molecules,  i.e., carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins, into smaller molecules that may be absorbed and used by body  cells C. Organization 1. The organs of the digestive system are divided into two groups: i.          gastrointestinal (Gl) tract or alimentary canal, which is a tube that extends from the mouth to the  anus through the ventral body cavity; it includes the following organs: a. mouth b. pharynx c. esophagus d.  stomach e. small intestine f. large intestine i.                     accessory structures, which include: a. teeth b. tongue c. salivary glands d. liver e.  gallbladder f. pancreas ii.                   Most of the digestive organs and structures are covered by slippery serous membranes called  the Peritoneum; the part lining the wall of the abdominal cavity is called the parietal peritoneum and the part  covering the surface of the organs is called the visceral peritoneum.  The mesenteries are folds of visceral  peritoneum that attach the small intestine to the posterior abdominal wall.  This arrangement of visceral  peritoneum in the abdominal cavity allows movement of the viscera and provides a conduit for blood  vessels, lymphatics and nerves to reach viscera. 2. General Histology of the GI Tract. The wall of the GI tract, especially from the esophagus to the anus,  consists of four major layers or tunics which, listed in sequence from innermost to outermost, are: i.          mucosa, which is a mucous membrane that surrounds the lumen; consist of lining epithelium,  lamina propria (loose connective tissue) and muscularis mucosa (thin layer of smooth muscle) ii.          submucosa, which consists of connective tissue             a. it is highly vascular             b. it contains a portion of the submucosal plexus which is a component of the autonomic nervous  system; this plexus innervates the muscularis mucosae and plays an important role in regulating secretions  by the GI tract iii.         muscularis, which consists of muscle tissue             a. in the mouth, pharynx, upper part of the esophagus, and the external anal sphincter, it consists of  skeletal muscle tissue which produces voluntary swallowing and voluntary control of defecation             b. throughout the rest of the GI tract, it consists of smooth muscle tissue that is generally divided  into two sheets:               inner sheet of circular fibers               outer sheet of longitudinal fibers             c. contractions help break down food physically, mix it with digestive secretions, and propel it along  the tract             d. it contains the myenteric plexus which is a component of the autonomic nervous system; this  plexus primarily controls GI tract motility iv.         serosa, which is a serous membrane             a. it is composed of connective tissue covered by a layer of simple squamous epithelium             b. below the diaphragm, it is also called the visceral peritoneum and forms a portion of the  peritoneum 3. Peritoneum:             i.          The peritoneum is the largest serous membrane of the body. ii. The peritoneum consists of  two layers:                         a. parietal peritoneum that lines the wall of the abdominal cavity                         b. visceral peritoneum that covers some of the abdominal organs and constitutes their  serosa                           between the two layers is a potential space called the peritoneal cavity that contains  serous fluid D. Mouth (Oral Cavity or Buccal Cavity) 1. The mouth is formed by the following structures: i.          cheeks that form the lateral walls; they consist of skeletal muscles covered externally by skin and  internally by nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium ii.          superior and inferior lips (labia) that are formed by the cheeks converging anteriorly             a. the lips consist of the orbicularis oris muscle covered externally by skin and internally by a  mucous membrane; between these two coverings is the transparent transition zone called the vermilion             b. the inner surface of each lip is attached to its corresponding gum by a midline fold of mucous  membrane called the labial frenulum             c. the vestibule is the space located between the external cheeks and lips and the internal gums  and teeth; the oral cavity proper is a space that extends from the gums and teeth to the fauces that  connects the oral cavity to the pharynx iii.         hard palate that forms the anterior portion of the roof of the mouth             a. it consists of the maxillae and palatine bones covered by mucous membrane             b. it separates the oral cavity from the nasal cavity iv.         soft palate that forms the posterior portion of the roof of the mouth             a. it is an arch shaped muscular partition covered by mucous membrane             b. it lies between the oropharynx and the nasopharynx             c. it has a uvula that hangs down from its free border             d. on either side of the base of the uvula are two muscular folds:               anteriorly, the palatoglossal arch (anterior pillar) extends to the side of the base of the tongue               posteriorly, the palatopharyngeal arch (posterior pillar) extends to the side of the pharynx               the palatine tonsils are located between the arches; the lingual tonsils are located on the base of  the tongue v.         tongue and its associated muscles form the floor of the mouth a.       it is composed of skeletal muscles covered by mucous membrane b.      the lingual frenulum secures the tongue to the floor of the oral cavity c.       taste buds found on the tongue surface are called fungiform and vallate (circumvallate) papillae d.      filiform papillae provide a rough surface for manipulation of food not taste e.       lingual tonsils are located at the back of the tongue             2. Salivary Glands: contains water and enzymes for food digestion and antibacterial function i.          Intrinsic salivary glands in the mucous membrane secrete small amounts of saliva to keep the  mouth and pharynx moist. ii.          Three pairs of Extrinsic salivary glands secrete major quantities of saliva when food enters the  mouth:             a. parotid glands are located inferior and anterior to the ears between the skin and masseter muscle             b. submandibular glands are located below the bone of the mandible             c. sublingual glands are located in the floor of the mouth superior to the submandibular glands   3. Teeth (Dentes): i.          The teeth are located in sockets of the alveolar processes of the mandible and maxillae; the alveolar  processes are covered by the gingivae or gums. ii.          Humans have two sets of teeth or dentitions:             a. deciduous teeth, primary teeth, milk teeth, or baby teeth a.       deciduous teeth are gradually lost between 6 and 12 years of age and are replaced by the permanent  or secondary teeth   the 32 permanent teeth appear between age 6 and adulthood b.      teeth are classified; incisors, canines, premolars and molars c.       teeth have a crown, neck and root and consist of enamel, dentin, root canal and cementum E. Pharynx 1. Mastication or chewing reduces the food to a soft, flexible mass called a bolus that is swallowed. 2. In deglutition or swallowing, the bolus of food first enters the pharynx, the funnel shaped tube that  extends from the internal nares to the esophagus posteriorly and the larynx anteriorly. 3. Deglutition moves food from the mouth to the stomach; it is a process that consists of three stages: i. in  the voluntary stage, the bolus passes from the mouth into the oropharynx ii. in the pharyngeal stage, the  bolus involuntarily passes through the laryngopharynx to enter the esophagus iii. in the esophageal stage,  the bolus involuntarily passes through the esophagus and enters the stomach F. Esophagus 1. The esophagus is a muscular, collapsible tube that travels from the laryngopharynx down through the  mediastinum anterior to the spine and posterior to the trachea, through the esophageal hiatus in the  diaphragm, and ends in the superior portion of the stomach.             2. The esophagus performs two functions: i.          secretes mucus ii.          transports food to the stomach             a. entry of food into the esophagus is regulated by the upper esophageal sphincter             b. during the esophageal stage of swallowing, food is pushed through the esophagus by involuntary  waves of muscular contraction called peristalsis, which is a function of the muscularis             c. passage of the bolus is facilitated by mucus             d. just above the diaphragm is the lower esophageal (gastroesophageal) sphincter which briefly  relaxes to permit passage of the bolus from the esophagus into the stomach G. Stomach 1. The stomach is a J shaped organ located directly under the diaphragm in the upper left portion of the  abdominal cavity; its precise position and size vary continually. 2. The stomach consists of four major areas: i. cardia, which surrounds the superior opening of the stomach  ii. fundus, which is the rounded portion above and to the left of the cardia iii. body, which is the large central  portion iv. pylorus, which is the inferior portion that connects to the duodenum 3. When the stomach is empty, its mucosa lies in large folds called rugae. 2.      The pylorus communicates with the duodenum via the pyloric sphincter. 3.      The surface of the stomach is
More Less

Related notes for BIOL 1010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit