Study Guides (234,455)
Canada (113,166)
Psychology (62)
PSYO 1012 (8)
Midterm

PSYCHOLOGY NOTES test 2.docx
PSYCHOLOGY NOTES test 2.docx

15 Pages
125 Views
Unlock Document

School
Dalhousie University
Department
Psychology
Course
PSYO 1012
Professor
Jennifer Stamp
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYCHOLOGY NOTES Problem Solving Thought is a pattern of neural activity  Propositional thought: verbal thoughts that we hear Imaginal thought: images we can see, hear, feel Motoric thought: mental representations of movements  Types of reasoning ­ Concepts are building blocks of thinking and reasoning. ­Concepts can be combined into propositions to create simple and complex thoughts. ­The propositions can serve as the basis for reasoning.  Concepts: basic units of semantic (relating to word meanings) thought­ categories  (prototypes) prototypes, which are the most typical and familiar members of the class.  Ex. Concept­students and intelligent people Proposition­students are intelligent people Deductive: principal accepted to be true. (general to specific) (top down)  Series problem: organize items into series to make conclusion Syllogism: use major premise (base something on something) and minor premise  to make conclusion.  ­example all chefs are violinists (major premise) Nigel is a chef (minor premise) then in  Nigel a violinist ­we make mental pictures to solve this, it would take is longer without the photo Conditional: if­then problems (if this happens then…) Inductive: reaching conclusion based on observation (facts to general) ­Hypothesis construction ­collected facts to build theory mental models­ people make mental representations of information ­problems with familiar components are easier to solve ­performance on syllogisms correlates more strongly with visual then verbal   The water jars problem discussed in class is most strongly associated with mental sets –the tendency to stick to solutions that have worked in the past (can lead to less effective problem solving) problem solving stage 1­interpret and understand stage 2­generate hypothesis (inductive)­ solution generation  stage 3­test the hypothesis (deductive) stage 4­evaluate results   problems with problem solving­solutions depend upon breaking a perception or thought  (examples: nine dot, crow and train, water jug) strategies: algorithm: formulas that generate correct answer ex. scrambled words heuristics: mental shortcuts­apple concept or schema  means end analysis­ make differences between present situation and desired goal  and make changes to reduce the differences  subgoal analysis­ forming steps to get to a goal or solution  errors in reasoning representativeness heuristic­extent to which something can be classified based on group  characteristics  (combo of two events cannot be more likely than either event alone) – confuse it with probability  base rate: likelihood that a chosen person would fit into a certain category (ratio or  percent) ­when personality description is presented, base rates are ignored  availability heuristic: using information more prominent in senses or memory (can blind  us from the base rates) belief bias­ abandoning logical rules in favor to personal beliefs  confirmation bias: trying to confirm rather than disconfirm theory (ask questions for  which yes is the answer) refers specifically to our tendency to prove or validate beliefs that we already hold instead of looking for evidence to disprove our assumptions over confidence- the tendency to overestimate correctness in factual knowledge framing- the same information can be presented in different ways- influences how we perceive information and can interfere with logical reasoning schema: mental representation of objects, scenes, events, etc. script­ mental framework concerning a sequence of events  reasoning schemas: mental representations of familiar types of problems  pragmatic: problems we solve tend to be practical (useful) problems  context dependent performance­ reasoning dependent on environment  ­due to use of pragmatic reasoning schemas  cross cultural differences­ non westerners solve problems on functional/concrete basis  (classification problem) standard IQ tests do not work well across cultures  belief bias (all things smoked are good… not cigarettes) distraction by irrelevant information­sock drawer experiment (Sternberg 1988) metacognition­ knowing whether you understand a concept  intelligence and IQ intelligence­ a controversial testing­ it is the ability to acquire knowledge  Galton­intelligence is hereditary ­developed first intelligence tests ­believed mental ability is related to neural quickness and sensory acuity  (sharpness) thought it was biologically based correlations­statistical procedure for correlation method ­tried to correlate sensory and reaction speeds with mental speed, vs. grades reaction time (press a button when a red light goes off) sensory acuity (exposed to sounds, indicate when you can hear it) hand strength  ­weakly correlated  ­thought you couldn’t do much to help your intelligence  binet­intelligence is not related to sensory acuity (like Helen Keller) ­made 2 assumptions abilities develop with age rate of development constant  ­developed first standardized intelligence tests intelligence scale­developed for French ministry of education to help struggling kids ­mental age: corresponds to age group whose average score the test results match ­IQ=Mental Age/Chorological Age X 100 (average is 100)  ­can have a different mental age then chorological age from testing ­IQ=intelligence quotient  ­this is not how we calculate IQ today, same terminology  three approaches  ­differential  identify/measure individual differences  ­developmental  asses changes in cognitive abilities in children (relating to the process of acquiring  knowledge by the use of reasoning) ­information processing cognitive processes people use to solve problems (focus on similarities) psychometrics­statistical study of psychological tests  factor analysis: looking for highly correlated clusters used to determine if tests measure similar abilities (test scores closely­taps into same  skills)­clusters or factors  general and specific intelligence  ­due to general intelligence scores on tests positively correlated with scores on other  tests(.3­.6) (intellectual performance) memory, logic, verbal fluency etc.  ­due to specific intelligence interested in differences identified 7 separate abilities (primary mental abilities)  from general intelligence  ­there is crystalized (use of existing knowledge­language or problem solving methods)   and fluid (solving new problems­more creative) three stratum theory of cognitive abilities general, broad (fluid and crystalized), narrow  (specific)  linguistic , logical, and visuospatial are measured by modern intelligence tests music inter­dealing with others intra­yourself body­knowing where your limbs are and being able to use them naturalistic better predictor or use grades then IQ also career, relationships, effective parenting etc.  emotion intelligence­perceiving emotions (branch 1)..facial expressions ­using emotions to facilitate thought (branch 2)…asking people about it ­understanding emotions (branch 3) …measure stress ­managing emotions (branch 4)   ….break down for exams ­modern tests modeled after binets Stanford­binet scale: not as commonly used today (mental age) ­WAIS­R: Wechsler adult intelligence scale, revised  ­WISC­R: Wechsler intelligence scale for children, revised  ­binets test was designed for children   ­Wechsler developed test for adults  actual intelligence quotient not useful for adults: wont see big cognitive ­scoring based on large statistical samples  ­bell curve­normal distribution (mean is pretty much 50% of population) ­set the average to be 100     Intelligence testing must meet 3 requirements  ­reliability (consistency of measurement) ­validity (how well does it measure, and what it is suppose to measure)  ­standardization (procedure and collection of norms)  types of reliability  ­test­retest reliability  consistency over time (IQ scores vary little after age 7)  ­internal consistency  consistency within test (adults test close to one)  ­interjudge reliability  consistency between scores  must be clear instructions  types of validity ­construct validity does test measure what is it intended  ­content validity  do test items measure knowledge that is intended to measure  ­predictive validity  do test scores predict other measures   are IQ valid –originally developed to predict academic grades  ­could be a good indication of how people pick up new tasks  standardization  standard procedures (environment, instructions are read) normal distribution (large sample, specify probabilities)  ­nature biological inheritance ­nurture environmental influence (began with galton vs. binet) a persons intelligence is due to genes and environment  a bigger brain may not mean you are smarter. Just in some regions. Women  typically have smaller brains then men.  Twin studies  ­if genes are important for IQ identical twins=high correlation  fraternal twins=low correlation  ­if environment is important  identical twins together: apart=different  parents: siblings=different  sex differences­how long it takes them to do it favoring women­paying attention to detail favoring men­ visually guided hand coordination mental representations –come in a variety of forms ­images ­ideas ­concepts­  ­principals  we manipulate these in form of language, thinking, reasoning, and problem solving ex. Reading these words on the pages mental representations are being  transferred.  Education is all about transferring ideas and skills from one mind to another.  Language­ system of symbols and rules to produce meaning Modern brain   50 000 years ago  Cave paintings 15 000 yeas ago Writing              3000 years ago  Maintains their social relationships  Four criteria  ­symbols –something that represents something else allows for transfer of mental representations ­structure­rules how symbols are be combined to form meaningful units (grammar) order of words (aka syntax)  communication and language is different  ­conveys meaning – allows for transfer  semantics­meaning of words in sentences  ­generative and permits displacement  infinite meaning (able to create new meanings)  able to talk about events objects need not be physically present   structure of language ­surface structure (ways symbols are combined) *syntax ­deep structure (underlying meaning) *semantics ­different syntax (different order of words) same semantics (same meaning of  sentence) ­similar syntax (same way words are ordered) different semantics (different  meaning of sentence  language units phoneme­ unit of sound that distinguishes meaning English has 40 Humans are capable of 100  Riceeeee could mean different then rice to us in a different language ­pley­ has 3 phonemes pl­ le­ ey Morphemes­ unit of meaning in language  Often single syllable, building blocks of language  English has 100 000  Universe universal university built of morphemes combining them 500 00 words, lots of phrases, infinite number of sentences   understanding language  bottom up processing ­­ analyzing individual elements (data driven) phoneme­ morpheme – words  top down processing—interpreting sensory info using existing knowledge speech segmentation –perceiving where each word within a spoken sentence  begins and ends (seems to occur automatically)  language in the brain ­broca’s  area­ speech production  in frontal lobe, near motor areas  ­wernickes area­ speech comprehension in temporal lobe, near auditory areas  ­aphasia­ deficit in production or comprehension  ­sex differences­ Language is more left lateralized. (in males mostly) (females show both  left and right) language acquisition  innate (biological foundations)­ easy for human children and adults do not correct  children’s grammar ­languages have same deep structure  sensitive period 6­12 months can start to distinguish between what sounds  specific to native tongue  (post puberty language learning is difficult) (Japanese loose I  and R sounds)  ­born with LAD (device) general grammar rules to all languages  learned (social learning)­children learn from adults (infant directed speech, naming  objects) ­many different languages ad there are lots of differences  ­language does not develop in isolation (when your alone­need to learn)  ­LASS (support system) ­neonates prefer to listen to language than to non­linguistic stimuli  bilingualism –more common than monolingualism  ­second language learned best early  in the brain (early bilingual same areas) (late bilingual different area) ­thought knowing two languages was a handicap, but people do not confuse languages  advantages in cognitive flexibility cognitive flexibility (being able to switch tasks) experiment­ bilingual children  outperformed monolinguals on a card sorting task involving a switch in dimensions     experiment showed that bilingual children use appropriate language based on  knowledge of other language  language determines thought­ (people with only a few words for color have more  difficulty perceiving the whole spectrum of colors, than people whose language have  many color words)  language can influence how we think­ writing a passage in a sexist way not as attractive  to everyone. (like framing) ­Asian words and symbols the languages use to represent numbers  ­English speakers struggle with words like eleven  (hamper the element of  children with 
More Less

Related notes for PSYO 1012

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit