Study Guides (247,963)
Canada (121,192)
Psychology (68)
PSYO 2080 (6)
Midterm

midterm two review.docx

8 Pages
153 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYO 2080
Professor
Jennifer Stamp
Semester
Winter

Description
chapter 7 03/06/2013 Informational social influence: others provide a source of new information which leads us to conform Example: Autokinetic phenomenon by Muzafer Sherif Light in the dark, it’s not actually moving but it  appears to.  alone most people say 5­10 cm but in groups they reach conformed collaborative answers.  They use eachother as information sources as it is not fully clear how much the light is moving.  Another example: everybody is looking to the back of the room, you would too to see what everybody else  is looking at – they have information that you don’t  Private acceptance: people conform because they truly believe the other person is right Public compliance: people conform in public but secretly still believe their own idea ex. light source – would  say the lights moving 8 cm cause group said so but they believe it’s only 3  *even after they left the group and were asked once again how far the light was moving they continued to  publicly comply and give the answer they gave in the group * we are more likely to conform if the task is important rather then if it’s not. When are we most likely to conform to informational social influence? 1. when the situation is a crisis – no time to think, we look at others in hopes that they know what to do. ▯  war of the worlds radio station – it was a show but people thought it was real news, millions of people were  terrified – others who were more rational checked other news stations to see if they were reporting this but  weren’t so they knew it wasn’t real. – contagion transmission of emotions/behaviours in a crowd  one  person freaks out everyone follows. 2. when the situation is ambiguous  3. when the person is an expert  ­ decisions on whether to conform to informational influence effects peoples behavior as well as their  interpretation of reality – as seen through police vs black thief experiment. (students conformed when told  most other participants thought it was the polices fault, and wrote an argument contesting to that). mass psychogenic illness­ occurrence of mass similar psychical symptoms in a group but know medical  cause. Bus example * construal’s – how we understand the world ­­ normative social influences: ACH we conform to be liked or prevent embarrassment – promotes group  adhesion  biologically unpleasing for us to resist normative influences. When you conform to what you know is a  wrong answer – activity in the posterior brain areas – vision and perception.  When they disagreed with the  group – it wasn’t, instead the amygdala (negative emotions) and caudate cucleas – social bheaviour were.  Social impact theory: how much normative influence effects you depends on three things:   1. immediacy/anonymous  – How physically far away they are – closer=more conformity and the more  variety in ideas the less conformity 2. strength/importance – how close your bond is with this person (the closer you are the more likely  you’ll conform) 3. size – the more the more influence but only to a certain extent. 4­5 = peak  4. ** number of targets of the influence – if your saying a speech – the more people with you the  nervous? Asch line test – to see if a simple task would allow people to stand up and say the truth – but they didn’t. *when primed with ridicule you’re more likely to conform/be influenced. Cartoon example ­­ minority influence: minority can influence majority if they consistently state their pov over time. – in  informational social influence more hten normative social influences  compliance – alteration in behavior after a direct request –  obedience: conformity in response to commands of an authority figure even if immoral – Stanley  Milgram (inspired by hollicost) electric shock experiment – every mistake = increased intensity.  Were  less likely to obey if it was somebody not of authority/expert – they were afraid the experimenter woud be  angry or disappointed if they quit anti­conformity – children to not conform that easily. Less likely to conform if control over your life is being  challenged.  door­in­the­face technique – will ask you a huge request which you’ll obvs say no to then you are asked a  minimal request in which you are likely to say yes too.   ­ zoo with troubled children example, if asked to do it for 2 years they said no but then just one trip they said  yes.  This is related to the reciprocity norm if I do something nice for you –lower the price = you should do  something nice for me/ pay up. foot­in­the­door technique – asked to get something small – sticker on your window that demotes drunk  driving then later asked a bigger request – to put a big ugly sign on front lawn. This is partically because of  self perception we evaluate ourselves, we are against drinking and driving, and if we say no maybe it  will look like we are pro? Lowballing – agreeing to purchase something at a low price, go thorugh paperwork and all, then they come  ack to tell you that that price wasn’t including x and y, but you’ve come all this way and feel like you’ve  already omitted to buying it so you do.  1. you feel as if you’ve committed to purchasing it 2. you get excited to have it so even with price increase 3. its probably only slightly more expensive theni f you were to go else where. chapter 8 03/06/2013 Group = two or more people who interact and are interrelated  Social role: shared expectations about how people in particular roles should behave – prison guard and  inmates  Mere exposure – somebody’s presense that neither benefits nor disadvantages us, they are just merely  there.   It effects our performance as if it is a simple task (simple maze for cockrock) we will do better around other  people.  However, if the task is complicated (complex maze) we will more then likely to worse.  Therefore, Social Facilitation is – the tendency to do better on a simple task and worse on a complex  one when being evaluated by others.   Ziance argued that ­ the prsense of others causes arousal and whe
More Less

Related notes for PSYO 2080

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit