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CEAP 250 Study Guide - Winter 2018, Comprehensive Midterm Notes - Verb, Passive Voice, Fallacy


Department
Comm-Engl for Acad Purp (SCS)
Course Code
CEAP 250
Professor
All
Study Guide
Midterm

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CEAP 250
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE
Fall 2018

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Lecture 1
genre: type of text (e.g. lab report, literary critique, argumentative essay)
o comes with certain expectations of form, content, style, presentation
o shared writings practices (expectations), in different academic communities)
purpose: type of genre plus the infinitive (e.g. to convey, summarize, etc.)
criticize/critical: evaluate, assess (both negative and positive)
Lecture 2
audience (WHO, HOW): who the writing is addressed to; the intended readers
o you must consider audience's knowledge and expectations
two authors in process of writing:
o author of original article: what audience did the author intend to write to
o author aka you who's trying to write a paper
purpose (WHY, HOW, WHEN, WHERE -> where the research was conducted, where the
funding is from): to + verb (infinitive)
organisation:
o structure can be used to skim
o coherence of the piece and the audience's expectations
o two aspects of flow: coherence (paragraph- and paper-level) and cohesion (sentence-
level)
topics must flow from A->B B->C C->D and should not skip any intermediate
topics/sentences to avoid the risk of not being cohesive
o can dictate or reveal content (whether it is chronological, polemic, etc.)
style: type of writing style and presentation of writing
o syntax matters and depends on the style adopted for the context of the writing
context: Q words: where, when, why?
o purpose
Active and Critical Reading
Task 9:
o first statement: said implicitly because it is a controversial claim which suggests that
the FSA has vested interests in being against organic food/farming
o example of passive voice: not saying the subject/noun that is blocked and not saying
why they are against saying positive things
o second statement: implicit negative evaluation of the text using the passive voice;
implicit critique because author does not have authority to criticize report, but uses
POV from experts in the field who do; journalist not wanting to reveal their bias
use of different voices in the article -> starts with voice of FSA and ends with
voice of criticizing side
active vs. passive voice
o active: He injected the mice -> the subject is doing the verb and doing that action to
the object
helpful in denoting power and agency in situations
o passive: The mice were injected -> subject/agent disappears
to read actively and critically:
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o guide reading by your purpose and to select what and which parts to read -> what am
I looking for and why am I reading this text? (use purpose to guide skimming and
scanning)
only keep author's purpose in mind when evaluating it
o organise the info according to your purpose, not by article's organisation
do not read author's abstract when writing article summary (only provides
author's purpose and does not benefit yours)
o annotation:
pay attention to any absolutes made in writing and the evidence they may use to
back it up
margin notes, matrix, mind map, "Cornell notes" (two columns: first column is
key points from article and author; second column are your notes and thoughts)
is it part of A, G, or C?
o determining the reliability of the source
o understanding who the writer is
o understanding multiple voices and opinions in a text
o thinking about what is missing from a text
o inferring meaning when it is not state clearly
o considering the relevance of ideas to your writing task
o expressing your opinion
informed evaluation, as opposed to giving an opinion
reading strategies:
o reading around/with purpose (7)
o skimming (10-11): reading first for gist/general idea, annotate topic sentences in
margins, then review
o scanning (12): looking for specific, purpose-related info
determine key words/ideas -> compare authors and see how their key words
differ
search for keywords and synonyms/antonyms in article
o annotating text (13): subjective -> your questions, impressions
uses thought momentum (must do it while reading or else you will forget)
prevents you from having to reread article
annotations can help you remember the content of the article, etc.
it is best to be explicit with any claim because you must provide support and cite your
evidence
o e.g. FSA article: direct quotes were not explicitly cited; author only introduced the
speaker
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find more resources at oneclass.com
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