Study Guides (380,000)
CA (150,000)
McGill (6,000)
ENGL (40)
Study Guide

ENGL 357- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 66 pages long!)


Department
English
Course Code
ENGL 357
Professor
Michael Raby
Study Guide
Final

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 66 pages of the document.
McGill
ENGL 357
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Geoffrey Chaucer (1343-1400)
- Cosidered the father of Eglish literature
- Born into family of London merchants
- Travelled a lot
- Not a professional writer
- Multilingual, but his surviving works are all in English
- His two most famous works are Troilus and Criseyde and The Canterbury Tales
Comparison
Old English, c. 500-1100 CE
Soþlice on þam dagum wæs geworden gebod fram þam casere augusto.
þæt eall ymbehwyrft wære tomearcod;
(Luke 2:1, Wessex Gospels)
Middle English, c. 1100-1500 CE
Forsoþe it is do, i þo daȝis a audeet ete out fro esar
august, þat al þe world shulde ben discriued,
(Luke 2:1, Wycliffite Bible)
Modern English, c. 1500 CE-present
And it came to passe in those dayes, that there went out a decree from
Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed.
(Luke 2:1, King James Version)
Medieval Britain: A Conquered Land
Much sorrow has been often in England,
As you may hear and understand,
Of many battles that have been and men have conquered this land.
First, as you have heard, the emperors of Rome.
Then the Saxons and Angles with battles strong,
And then those of Denmark that held it so long,
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

At last those of Normandy that be yet here
Won it and hold it yet;
-- Robert of Gloucester, c. 1270
The Romans
The Anglo-Saxons
The Danes (Vikings)
I recalled how the law was first composed in the Hebrew language, and thereafter, when the Greeks
learned it, they translated it all into their own language, and all the other books as well. And so too the
Romans, after they had mastered them, translated them all through myriad interpreters to their own
laguage…Therefore it seeed etter to e that e too should tur ertai ooks hih are the
most necessary for all men to know into a language that we can all understand. [King Alfred, Preface to
Gregory the Great’s Pastoral Care]
Old English
Germanic language
Contains runic characters: þ thor = th
Highly inflected language: word form changes depending on its grammatical function in the
sentence e.g. sta stoe
Case
Singular
Plural
Nom.
stan
stanas
Acc.
stan
stanas
Gen.
stanes
stana
Dat.
stane
stanum
The Normans
Thus came -- lo! -- England into Norman's hands,
And the Normans could not speak anything except their own speech,
And spoke French as they did at home, and their children did also teach,
So that high men of this land that of their blood come
Hold to all that speech that they took of them;
For unless a man knows French, men think little of him.
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version