Study Guides (380,000)
CA (150,000)
McGill (6,000)
HIST (400)
Study Guide

HIST 223 Study Guide - Comprehensive Midterm Guide: Beautiful Children, Avocado, Land Bridge


Department
History
Course Code
HIST 223
Professor
Allan Greer
Study Guide
Midterm

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 13 pages of the document.
McGill
HIST 223
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Week 2
September 7th, 2016
Origins, Myths, Migrations
Haida-British Columbia
“raven and the first men”-origin story, raven persuades humans to leave the partly open clam
they inhabit and they become the first Haida
Pawnee-Plains
“singing up the world”-origin story, world was sung into being by a chorus of powerful beings
Wendat-Huron of Southern Ontario
“Aataentsic (sky mother), Tawiscaron and Louskeha (her twin sons), origin story, sky woman
fell onto turtle’s back from skyworld and made the earth
Jewish, Christian, Muslim Origin Stories
God, humanity & nature are separate and distinct entities
God as creator and authority; distant from humanity
God rules, humanity enjoys dominion over plants and animals (they are subject to human will)
these three points distinguish Western origin stories from Indigenous creation stories
Monotheism and Polytheism
authoritative text (i.e. religious “truths” in Christianity) versus variant oral traditions (indigenous
were very tolerant of variance)
“the people”: universal humanity versus particular peoples (indigenous creation stories
describe a particular nation’s origin not humanity’s like in Western tradition)
Native stories connect a people, a territory, animals and spirits
Natives stress interpenetration of human spirit and animal realms (connected worldview)
(personality is not limited to just humans)
Monotheist dichotomies of divine/diabolical, good/evil (a moral dimension) versus the complex
characters of Indigenous stories who DO NOT represent fundamental good/evil beings
English translations distort (i.e. describing a mischievous being as evil rather than the more
complex Native understanding of the character in oral history)
Archaeologists’ Stories
earliest evidence of humans in Americas about 15,000 years ago in Monte Verde, Chile
DNA evidence links Native Americans and peoples of North-Eastern Asia
lower sea levels during Ice Age allowed migration from Siberia to Alaska (Bering Land Bridge)
Theorized ice-free corridor along the Rocky Mountains allowing passage across North
America glaciers
new evidence suggests this pathway further South didn’t exist until 12, 600 years ago
land bridge theory is now controversial because there is evidence of people further south 15,
000 years ago (much earlier then when passage across the Rockies was possible)
Maybe they went by water following the coast South after crossing the Land bridge?
Many different theories
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Week 2
Historian’s Stories
When and where does the history of the Americas begin?
Settlers-national history: European discoverers and settlers seen as founders of a nation and
the beginning of its history
Most North American history is packaged as the beginning of a nation (a European one)…the
concept that there was history before the arrival of Europeans is lost
Canada and America seen as settler nation-states and their historical narrative reflects this
Natives seen as victims of history (assisting/hindering settlers and a point of tragedy)
then goal is to see Natives as makers of history
the problem of sources
bias of written sources (almost always written by colonists with prejudices, blindspots and
purposes)
New approaches: archaeology, oral history, decoding of pre-Columbian recording systems and
linguistic analysis are being used to explore history before settlers
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version