Study Guides (248,629)
Canada (121,645)
POLI 243 (41)
Midterm

2nd Midterm Study Guidedocx

2 Pages
196 Views

Department
Political Science
Course Code
POLI 243
Professor
Mark Brawley

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Description
Canada and Free-Trade Agreement w/ US System-level factors  Uruguay Trade Negotiations dragging on -> doubts about the availability/ stability of GATT.  As insurance Canada need access to sum foreign market in the future (FTA w/ US)  Signs that US was to practice more protectionism (NTB’s were already being deployed; tariffs were an option). Canada super interested in deciding on how were issues to be settled in international trade. Criticism of system-level: fears about breakdown of GATT existed for a long time. Why now does Canada decide to act? Also, it was apparent from Tokyo round that NTB’s were to appear occasionally in trade. System-level arguments are too vague. Domestic level: Electoral strategy of the Tories  Different provincial interests: traditional support in the West + support of QC. Free trade became the pivotal issue of the federal election. Ontario – main opposition.  Liberals – the opposition – were themselves divided on the issue, thus mounting a weaker strategy.  Tories were seen as successful economic leaders, as their previous election promises were indeed carried out. Could claim success with their previous policies. Bureaucratic Politics: TNO  DRIE – department of regional industrial expansion was a source of opposition to free-trade. Was to assist industrial sectors in trouble -> foreign competition was the source of trouble.  Much of bureaucratic opposition was cut by setting up TNO (trade negotiator’s office). Giving it resources, able leadership (Hart, Reisman). Office specifically dealing w/ US trade issues. While the USTR (US trade representative) was both understaffed and had other issues to deal with (Canada was rather minor). TNO also has stron
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