Study Guides (248,075)
Canada (121,283)
POLI 243 (41)

POLI243-IDs.docx

7 Pages
142 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLI 243
Professor
Mark Brawley
Semester
Winter

Description
Liberalism 1. Mercantilism and Classical liberalism: Adam Smith writes economic critique of  regime taxation, equates wealth with consumption (Ricardo also an advocate). ­ Individuals are primary actors. ­ Individuals are rational, unitary and maximize utility. ­  ∑ Individual indifference curves = Societal indifference curve. ­ Advocates for political and economic freedom. ­ Everything can be traded 2. Commercial liberalism: There are positive spin­offs to free trade, other than the  aggregate benefits from individuals on opposite sides of mutual trade between states. ­ Individuals: primary, rational unitary actors who maximize utility ­ Since everything can be traded, trade is key to world peace and cooperation (the  route to cooperation & peace) ­ Hull agrees: Barriers = war because industrializing countries need resources one  way or another. 3. Republican liberalism: Kant, Wilson. Democracies do not fight one another. ­ Individuals: primary, rational unitary actors who maximize utility ­ National self­determination will lead to pursuit of creation of wealth & peace. ­ All liberal theories emphasize exchange, cooperation and mutual benefits. ­ Liberalism in general is similar to realism’s complex interdependence, &  idealism’s focus on cooperation. ­ Absolute gains over relative gains. ­ Policy looks towards national security when faced with non­republican states 4. Analytical liberalism: Dominant IPE approach today. Move away from normativity  and greater incorporation of economics. Moravosik is a supporter. ­ Economy dictates domestic interest; politics determined how these interests are  portioned. ­ Domestic political winner embodies their interests in the state, globally. ­ IR determines that policy outcome, which then determines domestic interests, and  cycle begins again. ­ Problems: domestic tedium, reliance on economics and open to large debate. 5. Liberals and the System level: This is a level usually associated with realism. ­ Trade is driven by economic differences. ­ Hierarchy is not important, but how states specialize and achieve gains. ­ Economic interdependence should deter war. ­ Emphasis on non­state actors.  ­ Sovereignty questions: economic sacrifices must be made to keep it. 6. Liberals and the Domestic level: This is a level usually associated with liberalism. ­ Trade is a route for “laterally pressured” (north = larger populations, more  technology) to achieve domestically lacking resources, and prevent imperialism. ­ Democratic regimes have a history of tolerance, pluralism (Wilson’s 14 points,  Democratic Peace Theory).  Democracies are slow to act, can “oversell” foreign  policy to get votes. ­ Economic policy, bureaucracy and interest groups all affect foreign policy. ­ Social actors and state are on a gradient in terms of influence. ­ Negatives of free trade: externalization and reduction can occur. 7. Liberals and Bureaucratic politics: ­ Parliamentary systems less inclined to have bureaucratic policy­making  tendencies. 8. Liberals and the Individual level: 9. Liberals and Trade: ­ Specialization through diverting a country’s resources towards their strengths =  more goods globally at less cost, overall consumption increases. ­ Assumes full employment and balanced trade. ­ Believe in H­O model of comparative advantage and S­S theorem. ­ Modern liberals: powerful states could enforce functionality. Markets  sometimes need stabilization (recognize it’s not always self­regulating), through  such an actor. ­ Trade redistributes wealth domestically, so distributional consequences will  determine trade policy on the international stage. ­ Focus on maximizing one’s own wealth, not relative to others. ­ Odell: Liberal in the sense that he supports free trade and focuses on the domestic  level. 10. Liberals and Monetary Relations: ­ Economic models identify the array of domestic interests. This is a fight between  (i) “hard” and “soft” money (creditors vs. debtors), (ii) tradable vs. non­tradable,  (iii) middle vs. lower class and (iv), commodity producers vs. producers of  complex goods. ­ Domestic politics are used to come up with policy (depends on political regime  type and representative system). ­ States pursue preferences on the international stage. ­ IR politics are interactions with other economic partners’ preferences to shape IR  ‘regime’. Realism  1 .    Ideal  normative theory from Wilson – realism formed as a result of this. ­ Human behaviour can be perfected ­ “Harmony of interest” exists ­ War never appropriate: trust in laws and institutions to find peace.  2 .    Classical reali  formed in response to idealism. ­ War has always been a part of problem­solving, this will not change. ­ Morgenthau, Carr, Niebuhr are early classical realists, post WWII. ­ Humanity’s will to survive means they are inherently selfish. ­ This will to survive = will to dominate.  ­ Competition to dominate = struggle for relative power over other states.  3 .    Structural reali  Pushed by Waltz in the 1950s, says classical realism focuses too  much on human nature. States aren’t divided into “good” and “bad” states. ­ States are primary, rational and unitary actors. ­ The international system is anarchic and separate from domestic & sub­ domestic politics (ordering principle ­ OP & differentiation of the parts ­ DP) ­ States seek to maximize their own power, and some have more than others  (distribution of capabilities). This final aspect in particular is always changing,  whereas OP and DP are constantly changing.  4 .    Neo­reali  Survival (security) only a minimal goal. Once achieved, others become  more important. ­ Same ideas as above, but states se
More Less

Related notes for POLI 243

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit