Study Guides (400,000)
CA (150,000)
McGill (6,000)
POLI (800)
Study Guide

[POLI 231] - Final Exam Guide - Everything you need to know! (76 pages long)


Department
Political Science
Course Code
POLI 231
Professor
Arash Abizadeh
Study Guide
Final

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 76 pages of the document.
McGill
POLI 231
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Lecture 2 Outline: Antigone
A. Conflict b/w Creon & Antigone: many dimensions:
1. Family ties (private) vs Political ties
- This conflict is strengthened in the play since Creon is aAntigone’s uncle which
therefore mixes the cities politics will family business and conflicts.
-Antigone is as well seen mixing conflicts with politics and family as is is
supposed to marry the son of her uncle who is the ruler of the lands
-There is as well a family conflict regarding policies between Antigone and her
Sister. Antigone wants to rebels against the city’s unjust politics set by her uncle
while her sister wants to remain true to the laws and orders
2. Woman vs Man
-“We are only women” Antigone’s sister
-There is a conflict between Antigone and her sister regarding the role of women
in their society and politics. Her sister thinks women should do as they are told
and not confront politics as she thinks it is a mans job to do that. Antigone
thinks women can confront politics and laws as much as anyone else can.
-Creon has the same view as Antigone’s sister as he thinks “no women sell rule”
making a statement that he does not believe in giving power to women.
-There is a conflict between Antigone and Creon about this subject because he
faces Antigone’s challenge against that law and as well, the fact that a women is
challenging him, he takes it as a direct attack towards his manly hood and his
position as a man.
-This portrays the reoccurring theme of private and public mixed together in
conflicts.
3. Individual (conscience) vs State
- One important aspect of the individual versus the state in this play is Creon’s
perception that anyone’s highest level of dedication should be towards the state
and not towards ourselves or someone else. He follow the thought that without this
dedication, there would be chaos and no civil order
4. Religious Duties vs Political Duties
-On one side, Antigone bases her actions against politics and steers toward
religion and the divine laws. Creon thinks otherwise.
-She thinks that there are political duties but religious and moral duties have the
upper hand when making a decision
-In that case there is a clear distinction between immoral and illegal actions.
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

B. Question of Nature of Regime
-Authoritarian ruler vs. ruler responsive to counsel
- In this case it is not sure wether creon is an authoritarian ruler or if he really does
respond to the great council helping him with advice
-Authoritarianism: Creon
-Creon (I am the ruler) vs Haemon (no one man rules)
Creon desires having response over the people that he rules
It is perceived the glory and fame in this play depend on how people
perceive you
-Responsiveness of Ruler
1. Haemon (son):
Since it is seen how people see you is how they like you as a ruler,
Haemon shows to Creon that his actions against Antigone made people
perceive him in a bad way and that he is loosing support and popularity
Haemon responds only to what gods think and the vie of the general
public (he is having multiple inputs of information)
2. Teiresias blind prophet
Creon does not want to respond to his view even if the prophet was
always correct in the past. This is because it goes against his political
stance as an authoritarian ruler
3. Chorus of Theban Elders
The chorus of the elders seem to have some impact on Creon’s view
especially in the end but he is still not too responsive to what they have
to say and with his authority he scares them into saying advice he will
like to hear
This shows how the authoritarian style has very little sources of input for
advice and information (Creon) in contrast to the responsive style (Haemon)
where he has multiple sources of input and he responds accordingly to that
input.
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version