Study Guides (248,217)
Canada (121,408)
Geography (172)
GEOG 1HA3 (50)
Midterm

Geog Notes from Nov 7- End- Post- Midterm

34 Pages
149 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
GEOG 1HA3
Professor
Walter Peace
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 16­ What is GIS? 11/10/2011 What is GIS? Is not new (> 45 years of R&D) however, it is consistently evolving Today it is a multi­billion dollar business used in many sectors of our economy What is Geotechnology? Remote sensing Global Positioning System (GPS) Geographic Information Systems (GIS) GIS Inventory, analyze aspects of the world Takes numbers and words on data bases and puts them on a map Organizes collection of hardware, data, people that work together to manage, map, analyze geographic  data Linking data to place Why is it important? GIS powerfully integrates many different types of data Helps support sound decisions making processes Provides more meaningful analytics GIS adds value to existing data Leverages existing IT data investments GIS makes information presentation relevant Empowers people to see and take action Allows rapid evaluations of alternatives Political Geography Map of voter turnout  VIG 5 Things that can be Gained from VIG? Spatial relationships Temporal relationships Social patterns Trends Diffusion of ideas Other Human Geography Applications Population and health geographies Geographies of cities and settlement Week 11 11/10/2011         Lecture 17­ The Social Geography of the City Week 11 11/10/2011 See Norton Ch 13 Questions: To what extent do (Canadian) cities conform to the concentric zone model? What does the social geography of Toronto, Montreal, Hamilton, etc. Look like? What are the current trends? Patterns­ Form, arrangement of phenomena in space Processes­ Forces/agents of change Canadian vs. American Cities 1971­ The North American City (Yeates and Garner) 1986­ The Myth of the North American City (Marcer and Goldberg) Are Canadian cities essentially the same as American cities? In general, Canadian cities: Are more compact Have higher population densities Have lower levels of poverty/disparity Week 11 11/10/2011 Feature greater investment in public transit Feature greater public investment in infrastructure Have experienced less racial tension Result▯ Canadian cities perceived to be more “livable” than American cities Pattern/process vary over time and space Why do cities look the way they do? The City as Social Space Place, language, religion, ethnicity, nationality, class, gender, etc.  Elements of culture Socially constructed Geographically expressed (on urban landscape) Social mosaic (of the city) Reflection of broader societal conditions (e. trends in economic restructuring; age/ family structure; and  immigration determine the social geography of the city▯ the city as a microcosm of society Patterns of social differentiation change over time, Ie. Social geography of the city changes over time Post WWII Societal Trends Affecting Canadian Cities  Economic Restructuring Deindustrialization­ Increase in service sector employment, free trade/globalization▯ impacts on urban,  regional, global economies Ie. Changing employment structure of Hamilton in post WWII era Changes in age structure/ family and household formation Week 11 11/10/2011 Increase in average age, decrease in number of children (% of Canada’s population  growth and development (mixture of socio=economic groups with elite near escarpment) 1945>Stability Walk­up apartments, 1941 pop. = 6,500 City Hall (1959), zoning by­laws allow high­rise development (1961) Suburban Growth In 1943, 7,600 In 1963, 77,000 1960­1974 is one of massive redevelopment Pop in 1961= 8,000, 1974= 9,800 High­rise apartment boom density; demolition, social change (family status) 1975­2009 stability Gentrification, heritage preservation, neighborhood plan revised, DNA Currently Pop. 12,000 Mixture of socio­economic/family status, but higher than Corktown/Beastly Issues Heritage preservation; traffic; psychiatric discharge rates (Service­dependent ghetto) Map of the Day Hamilton in 1876 Week 12 11/10/2011 Week 12 11/10/2011             Political Geography and The Map of the World Political States­ Basic division of the world closely related to language and religion Why does the political map of the World look like this? How/why does this map change over time? So what are the geographical aspects of politics? Nation­ A group of people sharing a common culture and an attachment to some territory (Is Canada a  nation by this definition?) State­ A set of institutions, an area with defined and internationally acknowledged boundaries; a political  unit Nation­State­ A clearly defined cultural group (nation) occupying a defined territory (state)▯ Nation =  culture (language, religion, ethnicity)▯ State= geographical area/ territory Nationalism­ The political expression of nationhood reflecting a consciousness of belonging to a  nation▯ Expressed through: flag, national anthem, architecture, holidays etc. Geopolitics The interplay between international political relations and the territorial context in which they occur National power, foreign policy, and international relations as influenced by geographic considerations of  location, space, resources and demography The relevance of space and distance to questions of international relations (P. 311) Week 12 11/10/2011 The study of the importance of space in understanding international relations Questions What factors underlie the current state of geopolitics? How can we better understand this and our geopolitical future? What role does geography play a determinant of geopolitical stability? Map of the Day The world in 1893 The left hand side is repeated on the right hand side, 2 Australia Back to Afghanistan History of instability in this region (“cradle of conflict”) In the last 100 years, Afghanistan invaded by: Britain­ mid 19  C; late 19  C Soviet Union­ 1980’s United States/ West­ 2001 Why this long history of conflict and instability? Located at the “confluence of civilizations” (Persian, Arab, Hindu, Russian) Heightened potential for ethnic strife, sectarian hatred, and national rivalry What are the implications of these conflicts (Afghanistan, Balkans, etc.) for the world’s geopolitical stability? Week 12 11/10/2011 The Geography of War and Peace 334­336 Conflicts­ 5 categories Between states Ie. Vietnam War Independence movements against foreign domination/occupation; usually a result of decolonization, Ie.  Belgian Congo (1958­1960) Secession conflicts Ie. Tibet (1955­1959) Civil war (within a state) Ie. Cuba (1956­1959); Iran (1978­1979) Action taken against states that support terrorism Ie. Us­ led invasion of Afghanistan (2001) and war on Iraq  (2003) Conflicts between states have greatest potential to cause global disruption Principal variables: power/ environment/ culture/ history 2 Views of World Order End of Cold War­ End of major wars between States (but still local wars) Next major conflict­ Clash of civilizations or cultures (culture becomes dominant factor, not  economics) 9 major civilizations/cultures (Fig. 8.1
More Less

Related notes for GEOG 1HA3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit