Study Guides (400,000)
CA (150,000)
McMaster (9,000)
LABRST (100)
Study Guide

[LABRST 1A03] - Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam (35 pages long!)


Department
Labour Studies
Course Code
LABRST 1A03
Professor
David Goutor
Study Guide
Final

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 35 pages of the document.
McMaster
LABRST 1A03
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Pre-Industrial Work
Lecture 1 - Staple Production
Draw of the New World (the Americas)
-Gold - new economic opportunities
-God - find God, missionaries to convert large amounts
-Glory - large numbers came over for military purposes (major wars -> Mexico)
Staples
-Dominates Early Economy
-Harold Innis = Classic Definition!
- “Business of extracting or acquiring resource commodities in order to sell them to an
external market”
-The nature of staples change over time
-Early staples in Canada: fish, fur
-Staples are the biggest engine of the economy, where most of the money and investment
tends to come from
-Export driven
Fishery
-Fish = Grand Banks - enormous amounts of fish
-People from Europe (Portugal, Holland) coming to the Grand Banks to fish
-Migratory fishery - many boats came for the Spring, no shortage of people willing to do it
-Residential fishery - starts with place holding
-Settlements begin to emerge around the coast of Newfoundland
-Develops into Nfld. Fishery (Outport fisheries - focused entirely on the water)
-eg. Portugal Cove
Life in Residential Fishery
-“Life is on the Water”
-Structural Disadvantages !
- Fish prices - little knowledge on the prices of product selling!
- Debt - loans taken out to start fishing companies
-Isolation - difficult and expensive to get groceries or any other goods
-Distinct Culture - accents
Fur Trade
-Truly Unique Trade
-Product: Beaver fur hats, luxury item, high demand in Europeans
-Unites two different groups of people to come together in the trade!
- Europeans and Aboriginals
-Commerce and Interchange Between Peoples
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

-Mutual Dependency - each side of the trade depends on the other!
- Aboriginals: Trapping!
- Whites: Trade Goods!
!
Hudson’s Bay Route!
- set up forts along Hudson’s Bay!
- waited for Aboriginals to come to them with beaver!
- very passive way of doing business
-Always do business with people they know well, build a relationship
-Maintenance; Then: Trade and Festivals
-Feasts and cultural events when Aboriginals showed up
-Then, exchange of goods!
!
Montreal Based Trade
-financed by the Bank of Montreal
-Emerges later
-Goes inland to the Aboriginals to get the fur
-Needed transporters (voyageurs) to knit the route between forts and Aboriginals
-Voyageurs would transfer by canoe, furs and goods.
-Portages: carrying the canoe
Voyageur Experience
-Injury
-Fear
-Wilderness
-Freedom!
- environment
-“Liminality” !
- didn’t fit into the forts or the Aboriginals!
- many married Aboriginal women
Timber Industry
-#1 Staple in early 19th Century
-“Hewers of Wood” Winter Work!
- providing staple goods to other areas
-Timbering Culture!
- tough, adventurous
-Winter Industry !
- easier to move the wood because the ground is frozen
-Log Running: roll trees down hills into rivers.
Keys to Canadian Staples
-Seasonal
-Small settlement
-Small labour force
Slave Labour
-Labour intensive work
-Sugar, cotton, tobacco, rice
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version