Study Guides (248,527)
Canada (121,610)
Physics (102)
Final

PHYSICS 1L03 Final: Physics 1L03 Exam Review.docx
Premium

6 Pages
228 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Physics
Course
PHYSICS 1L03
Professor
Reza Nejat
Semester
Fall

Description
Forces Force­ a push or pull exerted on an objecresulting from the interaction between two objects • Always a pair of forces – same magnitude,  different direction • Either contact or contact­free force • A vector quantity • Forces are additive • An external force changes the velocity and causes acceleration of an object (acceleration produced α amount of  force) Contact Forces­ require physical contact between two interacting objects Contact­Free Forces­ require no contact between two interacting objects and acts over a distance (field forces) Fundamental Forces (contact­free) ⇒ Gravity­ the force between masses ⇒ Electromagnetic (long range)­ force between charges ⇒ Strong Nuclear (short range)­ holds atomic nuclei together ⇒ Weak Nuclear (short range)­ beta decay (radioactivity) Convenience Forces (contact) ⇒ Surface forces o Normal Force  Force exerted by a surface on an object that is pressing against the surface   Perpendicular to surface in contact  Results from compression of molecular bonds o Force of Friction  The force that resists the motion of an object across another  Parallel to the surface of contact • Static Friction o No motion o Maximum value o Always equal to applied force • Kinetic friction o Motion o Smaller than max. Static friction o Proportional to normal force ⇒ Tension o The pulling force o Results from the stretching of molecular bonds ⇒ Spring force o If you stretch a spring, how hard does it pull you back ⇒ Drag o Force that opposes the motion through liquids and gases ⇒ Viscous o How resistive the fluid is to flow Equilibrium ⇒ If the net force that acts on an object is zero, the object stays at rest or moves at constant velocity o Static Equilibrium­ net force is zero, object is at rest o Dynamic Equilibrium­ net force is zero, object moves at constant velocity Newton’s Laws Newton’s First Law ⇒ If the net external force acting on an object is zero, an object at rest remains at rest, and an object in motion  continues to move with a constant velocity (uniform motion) ⇒ Changes in velocity require external forces ⇒ The magnitude of drag depends on the speed of the object Newton’s Second Law ⇒ If a force (F) acts on an object of a mass – inertial mass (m), it produces an acceleration (a) of the object: F=ma ⇒ If several forces act on an object, the sum of forces (net force) produces the resultant acceleration ⇒ The acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on the object and inversely  proportional to its mass Newton’s Third Law ⇒ If two objects interact, the force exerted by object 1 on object 2 is equal in magnitude and opposite direction to  the force exerted by object 2 on object 1 ⇒ Called an interaction pair Weight­ the force due to gravity on an object Apparent Weight­ weight that is measured by a contact force (spring force in a scale), this changes whenever the contact  force between you and the measuring device changes Center of Mass (CM)­ of a system is the point at which all the mass of the system may be considered to be concentrated • May be inside or outside the object • The translational motion of the centre of mass of the system is the same as if the mass of the system is  concentrated at that point • In general this will NOT be the objects centre nor will it divide an object into equal mass points ⇒ The mass of an object can be distributed uniformly or non­uniformly  • The system may be a group of objects (particles) or an extended object like our body Extended Object • Different parts move with different speed • So the motion of a body can be described in terms of the position and motion of the center of mass of the body  (point particle model) o For example: the center of mass of a ball thrown in the air follows a parabolic path and we can see this  because it is a simple point­like object o The centre of mass of a hammer also follows a parabolic path but it is harder to see o The centre of mass of a wrench follows a straight­line path as though it were a particle, but the wrench is  rotating around its centre f mass • The centre of mass is a mass­average position of the system ycm m 1 1+ 2 2 m1 + 2 X = m x  + m x cm 1 1 2 2 m1 + 2 ⇒ Symmetric objects: mass is distributed uniformly; the centre of mass is the geometric centre of the object ⇒ Asymmetrical Objects: non­uniform mass distribution; the centre of mass may be evaluated by suspending  Torque • The tendency of a force to produce rotation about an axis • May be considered as the rotational equivalent of force • Produces rotational acceleration like force produces translational acceleration τ > 0  ▯rotation is counterclockwise τ 
More Less

Related notes for PHYSICS 1L03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit