Study Guides (248,057)
Canada (121,267)
Psychology (966)
PSYCH 2B03 (65)

CH17 Textbook Notes

3 Pages
107 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 2B03
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Fall

Description
What you know about you: The Self According to William James, the self includes the me, the object of self­knowledge, and the I, the mysterious entity that  does the knowing. Psychology has much more to say about the me than the I.  The Self across Cultures Some cultural analyses have concluded that the idea of the “self” is a Western cultural artefact; other research has  compared the ways the self is conceptualized in different cultures, including issues of self­regard and self­determination. The Contents of the Self In terms of the me, the self comprises everything we know, or think we know, about what we are like, including both  declarative and procedural self­knowledge.   Declarative self:   An individual’s conscious opinions about his her own personality traits & other relevant attributes   1)Self esteem; overall opinion of whether you are good or bad, worth or unworthy, or somewhere between 2) More detailed; contains everything you know, or think you know, about your traits and abilities Self­esteem can cause problems when it is too low or too high because, according to Leary’s sociometer theory, it serves  as a useful gauge of one’s social standing. Psychologists theorize that the wide range of knowledge one has about one’s psychological attributes (ie the declarative  self) is located in a cognitive structure called the self schema. The self­schema can be assessed via S data (eg.  questionnaires, such as CPI) or B data (eg. reaction­time studies).  • A methodological implication is that the phenomena studied by cognitive oriented personality psychologists, and  trait psychologists, may not be as different as is sometimes presumed.  • One’s self­view (conceptualized as a schema or trait) may have important consequences for how one processes  information (… “domain of expertise”: helps us remember a lot of information about ourselves and process this  information quickly, but can keep one from seeing beyond the boundaries of their own self­image). • Case studies of brain­damaged individuals suggest that one’s sense of self and personality can remain intact even  when all the specific memories that created it are lost.  The self­reference effect refers to the enhancement of long­term memory that comes from thinking of how information  relates to the self.  Your view of your own capabilities—your self­efficacy—influences what you will attempt to do. Carol Dweck theorizes  that beliefs about the self are a major foundation of personality, that they affect what a person will do in life, and that they  can be changed.  Possible selves (images we have or can construct of the other possible ways we might be) can affect our goals in life. According to self­discrepancy theory, we have two kinds of desired selves that represent different foci to life:  • IDEAL SELF: our view of what we could be at our best; reward­based, GO system, focus on pursuit of  pleasures… the state of finally attaining all of the rewards you seek. Failure=depression (disappointment)  • OUGHT SELF: our view of what we should (as opposed to what we would like to) be; punishment­based, STOP  system. Failure= anxiety (fear) Accurate self­knowledge is a hallmark of good health  1)  People who are healthy, secure, and wise enough to see the world as it is, without the need to distort anything,  will tend to see themselves more accurately too  2)  A person with accurate self­knowledge is in a better position to make good decisions on important issues ranging  from what occupation to pursue to marriage partners Realistic Accuracy Model (RAM): One can gain accurate knowledge of anyone’s personality:   1) The person must do something relevant to the tra
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 2B03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit