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Describing Sound.docx

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Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3A03
Professor
Paul Faure
Semester
Fall

Description
September 11 , 2013 Psych 3A03: Audition Describing Sound Simple Harmonic Motion - Uniform circular motion - The displacement and vibratory oscillations of a mass attached to a spring, a bob attached to a pendulum and the vibrations of the tines of a tuning fork are all examples of simple harmonic motion - Simple harmonic motion can be defined as projected uniform circular motion - Uniform circular motion occurs when a body moves around the circumference of a circle at a constant rate (degrees per second) Sinusoidal Motion - Plotting the amplitude of displacement (or pressure variation) as a function of time yields the following time domain relationship (time domain waveform) - D(t) = Asin(2πft+ϕ), where:  D(t) = instantaneous amplitude  A = maximum amplitude  sin = sin function  2π: is the distance travelled (the actual signal that you trace)  f = frequency of vibration (how quickly we are going to trace out the circle)  t = time (how long we will be going around the circle for)  ϕ = starting phase Simple Harmonic Motion - Sinusoidal motion is an e.g. of simple harmonic motion - D(t) = Asin(2πft+ϕ) - The above parameters refer to the physical description of sinusoidal vibrations  Amplitude (loudness)  Frequency [or period] (pitch)  Starting phase (location)  Time [onset/offset/duration/rate]  Speed of sound (motion) Sound Transmission - Sound can travel through solids, liquids, or gases but not through a vacuum - Why not? - To understand sound transmission through a medium we must examine how the input forces influences  Particle displacement (x)  Particle velocity (v)  Particle acceleration (a)  Sound pressure (P) Sound Amplitude (A) - Amplitude of air particle displacement is proportional to applied force [Hooke’s Law: magnitude of restoring force of elasticity is directly proportional to magnitude o
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