Study Guides (248,566)
Canada (121,626)
Psychology (970)
PSYCH 3BA3 (14)
Final

STUDY NOTES FOR MT 1 - Condensed study notes (Intro, Positive States of Mind) - PSYCH 3BA3.docx
Premium

8 Pages
202 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3BA3
Professor
Aadil Merali Juma
Semester
Winter

Description
QUICKNOTES – MIDTERM 1 PSYCH 3BA3 Introduction Criteria of Positive Psychology 1. Statistical Criteria – individuals significantly above the mean in positive and/or below the mean in negative emotions, traits, cognitions 2. Personal Satisfaction – individuals pleased with emotions, traits, cognitions  3. Adaptive Criteria – individuals with emotions, traits, cognitions that helps them to function and succeed in life 4. Sociocultural Criteria – individuals with emotions, traits, cognitions that are valued by their culture or society; least used criteria Definitions of Positive Psychology − Valued subjective experiences; well being, contentment and satisfaction in the past, hope and optimism for the future, and flow and happiness in the present  (Seligman and Csikszentmihalyi, 2000) o Individual Level – positive individual traits; capacity for love and vocation, courage, interpersonal skills, aesthetic sensibility, perseverance, forgiveness,  originality, future mindedness, spirituality, high talent, wisdom  o Group Level – civic virtues and institutions that move individuals toward better citizenship; responsibility, nurturance, altruism, civility moderation,  tolerance, work ethic − Scientific study of ordinary human strengths and virtues (Gable and Haidt, 2005) − Scientifically informed perspectives on what makes life worth living; aspects of the human condition that lead to happiness, fulfillment, flourishing (Journal of Positive Psychology)  − Scientific study of strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to thrive o Positive Emotions – contentment with the past, happiness in the present, hope for the future  o Positive Individual Traits – strengths and virtues; capacity to love and work, courage, compassion, resilience, creativity, curiosity, integrity, self­knowledge,  moderation, self­control, wisdom  o Positive Institutions – strengths that foster better communities; justice, responsibility, civility, parenting, nurturance, work ethic, leadership, teamwork,  purpose, tolerance − Aristotle – The Good Life (refer to below) − William Bennett – Virtues; self discipline, compassion, responsibility, friendship, work, courage, perseverance, honesty, loyalty, faith  − Freud – motivation is to seek pleasure; life is a struggle between desires, real­world and moral constraints; mental health is the ability to work and love − Jung – highest motivation is to realize the archetype of the Self in our own personality; wholeness, unity, integration − Maslow – Self Actualization (refer to below) − Erich Fromm – find new unity through the development of all human forces, which are produced in three orientations i) biophilia ii) love for humanity and nature iii)  independence and freedom; unity with the world as a free individual by active solidarity and spontaneous activity  − Viktor Frankl – last of human freedoms is to choose ones attitude in any given set of circumstances; discover meaning in 3 ways i) creating a work or doing a deed ii)  experiencing a something or encountering someone iii) by the attitude we take toward unavoidable suffering  − Martin Seligman – president of APA (1998­99); focuses on positive psychology; founded Positive Psychology Center at University of Pennsylvania West East Hedonia – live to experience pleasure; less about coEudaimonia – live to experience fulfillment, self development; contribution to  community, harmony with surroundings; psychologically better than hedonic The material world is unpleasant  ▯transcendence aftThe material world is unpleasant  ▯transcendence is possible during lifetime  Religion and philosophy are very separate Religion and philosophy are intertwined   West vs. East’s hands Can determine own fate; alter own circumstances Positive States of Mind Western Traditions  − Aristippus – Hedonism  o Goal of life – pleasure (mental, love, friendship, moral contentment, sensual); present pleasures should not be deferred for the sake of future pleasures o Control, not be controlled by pleasure; self­restraint is essential − Aristotle – The Good Life o Happiness = The Good Life = functioning well as a person = living the life of virtue o Virtue – state of character, disposition to act a certain way; character traits between excess and deficiency o Moral Virtue – subordinating sensual appetites to reasoning; acquired by practice o Intellectual Virtue – wisdom, understanding; acquired by teaching  o Self sufficient; cannot be improved; happiness is pursed for its own sake, not as a means to an end Eastern Traditions − Hinduism 1 QUICKNOTES – MIDTERM 1 PSYCH 3BA3 o Goal of life – ultimate self­knowledge and self­betterment o Reincarnated until full knowledge is reached; partial understanding and good works improves position  o Lose touch with inner Self due to involvement with physical self and search for happiness; physical always chancing  ▯happiness lies in awareness of  unchanging inner Self o Awareness of inner Self i) brings happiness and ultimate reality ii) liberates from unhappiness and reincarnation o Very old religion; do not know founding date − Confucianism o Goal – attaining virtue and morality  o Five virtues central to moral life 1. Humanity – benevolence, charity, love  2. Propriety – sensitivity to others, etiquette, 3. Duty – appropriate treatment of others  4. Wisdom – application of knowledge  5. Truthfulness – open and honest with others; taking responsibility  o Closest to Aristotle  − Taoism o Goal in life – achieving naturalness and spontaneity; striving is counterproductive o Follow natural flow of events and be spontaneous in ones actions (wu­wei) o Humanity, justice, temperance and propriety must be practiced without effort  o “Without form there is no desire; without desire there is tranquility; in this way, all things should be at peace” – pain from desire, not from object Buddhism (Siddhartha Gautama) − Large impact on Western psychology, especially humanists (Maslow, Rogers), Dalai Lama; first cognitive psychologist  − Human problems arise from ways we think − Nature of “Things” – i) fixed, unchanging entities do not exist ii) everything in the mind is a changing, ephemeral process iii) everything interconnected in a web of  conditions, coincidences and causation (butterfly effect, presence is conditioned) − Four Noble Truths 1. Life is filled with suffering 2. Suffering is caused by ignorance of reality and our attachment, c (of basic biological needs, ego needs, culture­conditioned needs) 3. Suffering can be ended by overcoming ignorance 4. Relief from suffering comes through the Eight­Fold Path − Eight­Fold Path Wisdom 1. Right View – to see and understand things as they really are; accurate perception of reality (long lasting, generic understanding) 2. Right Thoughts/Intention – commitment to mental and ethical self­improvement   Resistance to i) the pull of desire ii) feelings of anger and aversion iii) thinking or acting cruelly, violently or aggressively Virtue/Moral Excellence 3. Right Speech – truthful, gentle; speak only when necessary  4. Right Action – kind, compassionate, honest, respect goods of others; do no harm, do good 5. Right Livelihood – earn a righteousness, peaceful living  Mental Discipline 6. Right Effort – work toward wholesome states of mind  7. Right Mindfulness – see things and concepts clearly, be aware (constant current state) 8. Right Contemplation/Meditation – concentration on wholesome thoughts and actions  − Four Functions of Meditation 1. Focusing – deep and intentional focus on one object (internal or external) 2. Developing Mindfulness – deliberate, attentive awareness; i) body ii) feelings iii) thoughts 3. Desensitizing Oneself – liberated of negative feelings when object they arose from is meditated on     4. Seeking Understanding  − Universal Virtues 1. Loving Kindness (maitri) 2. Compassion (karuna) 3. Altruistic Joy (mudita) 4. Equanimity (upeksa) 2 QUICKNOTES – MIDTERM 1 PSYCH 3BA3 − Nirvana – state in which the individual has no desires for anything and understands reality  o Premortal Nirvana – the good life (related to Maslow B­values and Rogers roll)ng with the flow o Postmortal Nirvana – heaven; perfect understanding after death  Maslow – Self­Actualization − Model – two mindsets for guiding behaviour o D­Cognition – Deficiency Motivation; active, narrow, purposive, striving; motivated by fulfilling needs you are deficient of  Similar to Buddhist attachment  o B­Cognition – Self­Actualization; passive, broad awareness; rising above desires and attachments; guided by values, not deficiencies  Most purely expressive – highest motive is to be unmotivated and non­striving  Intrinsic growth of what is already in the organism (or what the organism is); development proceeds from within, rather than without; fulfillment  of ones potential − B­Values – the facets of being 1. Wholeness – unity, integration, interconnectedness, simplicity, organization, structure, dichotomy transcendence (reality is not in two categories but in  shades and degrees), order  2. Perfection – necessity, rightness, inevitability, completeness  3. Justice – fairness, orderliness, lawfulness  4. Aliveness – process, spontaneity, self­regulation, full­functioning  Right Mindfulness  5. Richness – complexity, intricacy, differentiation   Right Mindfulness  6. Beauty – rightness, aliveness, wholeness,  simplicity, perfection, completeness, uniqueness, honesty 7. Goodness – rightness, desirability, justice, benevolence, honesty 8. Uniqueness – idiosyncrasy, individuality, novelty  9. Effortlessness – ease, lack of strain, grace, perfection, beauty, functioning   Right Action  10. Playfulness – fun, joy, amusement human, effortlessness, exuberance  11. Truth, honesty, reality – simplicity, richness, beauty 12. Self­Sufficiency – autonomy, independence, environment­transcendence, self­determining  − Eightfold Way – 8 ways to self­actualize  1. Concentration  Right Mindfulness  2. Growth choices  Right Action 3. Self­awareness  Right View 4. Honesty – take responsibility for actions 5. Judgment – trust own judgment for making decisions  6. Self­Development 7. Peak experiences 8. Lack of ego defenses  − Characteristics of a Self­Actualizing Person 1. Accurate perception of reality – perceive what is, rather than imposing own categories on the world   Similar to Buddhist Right View 2. Acceptance – accept nature and selves without judgment   Similar to Buddhist Equanimity  3. Spontaneity – naturalness, simple; lacking artificiality   Similar to Buddhist Non­Self; Taoist Rolling With The Flow 4. Problem­Centered – concerned with others and things outside of themselves; rather than ego­ or self­centered; enlist much energy into life mission   Similar to Buddhist Right Action  5. Comfort with solitude – solitude without harm or discomfort; enjoy solitude 6. Autonomy – not dependent on world or extrinsic satisfactions; depend on own development and growth; choose own goals, resist enculturation  7. Fresh appreciation – fresh and naive appreciate basic goods of nature; even with ecstasy  3 QUICKNOTES – MIDTERM 1 PSYCH 3BA3  Similar to Buddhist Right Mindfulness  8. Human kinship – identification and affection for humanity, as if all members of a single family; genuine desire to help the human race  Similar to Buddhist Right Action, Right Livelihood, Compassion, Loving­Kindness  9. Humility and respect – friendly, do not notice differences in class, education race etc; humble in own knowledge and skills, willing to learn 10. Deep interpersonal relationships – few; deeper and more profound that other adults (not necessarily more than children) 11. Peak Experiences (B­cognition) – I) Object­Oriented Peak Experiences II) Philosophical or Religious Peak Experiences  Similar to Buddhist Right view, Right Mindfulness − Qualities of Peak Experience 1. Wholeness and universality – whole world in unity as a single rich, live entity; all significance is captured in one object or moment  2. Full absorption – the percept is exclusively and fully attended to 3. Richness of perception – repeated experience allows for more enjoyment and ability to see more of it in various senses  4. Human irrelevance – look at nature as if it were there for itself, not to be used 5. Ego­transcendent perception – so absorbed in object that self disappears; unmotivated, impersonal, desire­less, object centered; two into larger whole;  complete involvement  6. Spatial and temporal disorientation – outside of time and space, subjectively; contraction (rushed by) or dilation (extremeness slow) of time   7. Always positive – being is only neutral or good; evil comes from not seeing the world as it is 8. Different view of reality – more absolute, less relative; perceptions of reality without man; unmotivated, detached from man, space­ and timeless 9. Passive and receptive rather than active – undemanding, desire less awareness, rather than actively searching for desires; not completely so 10. Emotion of wonder – awe, reverence, humility, surrender  11. Compassion  12. Falling away of negative emotions – loss of fear, anxiety, renunciation, inhibitions, defense, control − Individual – Peak Experiences as identity experiences  1. More integrated – experiences self more fully, yet loss of ego 2. More spontaneous and expressive – less self conscious 3. More effortless and natural  4. More fully functioning – working at full capacity at best and fullest  5. More in charge – makes choices, source of own decisions 6. More creative – cognition is more improvised, impromptu, novel; less prepared, planned, designed; unsought, unneeded, unstriven for  7. More individual and unique 8. More at one with the world – ego­less; fuses with world  − After Effects of Peak Experience  1. Removal of neurotic symptoms 2. Change self­awareness – see self more clearly; elevated and improved 3. Change view of others and relationships with them – more tolerant, accepting  4. Change view of the world 5. Creativity, spontaneity, expressiveness, idiosyncrasy released 6. Desire to repeat experience 7. Life i
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3BA3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit