Study Guides (248,269)
Canada (121,449)
Psychology (970)
PSYCH 3BA3 (14)
Dr.Byers (1)

Textbook Notes.docx

14 Pages
203 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3BA3
Professor
Dr.Byers
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 1 – Welcome to Positive Psychology  01/15/2014 ­ takes a look into human strengths, away from previous weakness­oriented approach ­ Building Human Strength: psychology’s forgotten mission by Martin E.P. Seligman • Before the war, psychology based on curing mental illness, making lives of people more  fulfilling and identifying high talent, after way: treat mental illness only • Viewed human being essentiall as passive, framework around repairing damaged habits,  drives, childhoods and brains • Prevention inmental illness come from focusing on promoting the competence of individuals • Courage, optimism, interpersonal skill, work ethic, hope, honesty and perseverance help  against mental illness • Best work is amplify strengths rather than repairing weaknesses Going from Negative to Positive ­ There is a need to know about the good in people Positive Psychology Seeks a Balanced, More complete view of Human Functioning ­ Pathological view was productive, but were incomplete in their portrayals of humankind ­ Develop inclusive approach that examines both weaknesses and strengths of people, as well as  stressors and resources in the environment Views of reality that include both positive and negative ­ Reality resides in people’s perceptions of events and happenings in their world, scientific perspectives  thereby depend on who defines them ­ Negotiated by scientists and social constructions Personal Mini Experiments ­ Bring positive psychology into your life: ie focus on the positive that you will do tomorrow before you go  to bed, repeat it when you wake up Life Enhancement Strategies ­ Mindful approach to everyday living will reveal power of positive emotions and human strengths ­ Goals: connect with others, pursue meaning and experience some degree of pleasure or satisfaction  (love, work and play) • Associated with normal aging and human growth Chapter 2 – Eastern and Western Perspectives  01/15/2014 ­ Eastern find that world is perpetual state of flux vs. Western resolve problems more linearly ­ Eastern move with cycle of life until the change process becomes natural and enlightenment vs.  Western search for rewards Historical and Philosophical Traditions Athenian Views ­ Aristotle moral virtues: courage, moderation, generosity, munificence, magnificence, temper,  friendliness, truthfulness, wit, justice. Friendship ­ Aristotle intellectual virtues: associated with wisdom ­ Influence of political community on development and maintenance of these virtues • Help self actualize Judeo­ Christianity ­ Old testament: Faith, hope, charity ­ Aquinas 4 cardinal virtues: fortitude (courage), justice, temperance, wisdom AND faith, hope, charity ­ New testament: leadership, faith, mervy,love, joy, hop, patience, hospitality ­ Other virtues given in proverbs, Beatitudes, Tkmund Confucianism ­ Leadership and education are central to morality ­ Parallel to thoughts of Ristotle and Plato regarding responsibility of leaders to take charge of the group,  but also collectivist ideal of taking care of others in the group ­ Jen (humanity), yi (duty to treat others well), li (etiquette and sensitivity for others feelings), zhi  (wisdom), xin (truthfulness) Chapter 2 – Eastern and Western Perspectives  01/15/2014 Taoism ­ Dow = the way ­ Tao is energy that surround everyone and is a power the envelops, surrounds and flows through all  things ­ Cannot be taught, good and bad experiences contribute to greater understanding of the way ­ Humanity, justice, temperance and propriety must be practice without effort Buddhism ­ Seeking the good of others, suffering if part of being and it brought on by the human emotion of desire ­ Nirvana: state in which self id freed from desire for anything ­ Brahma Viharas: virtues that are above all others in importance – love (maître), compassion (karuna),  joy (mudita), equanimity (upseka) Hinduism ­ Emphasize the interconnectedness of all things ­ Live life so fully and correctly that one would go directly to afterlife without having to repeat life’s  lessons in reincarnated form ­ Attain self knowledge and strive for ultimate self betterment ­ Be good to others as well as to improve themselves ­ Karma: precious life’s good actions correlate directly with better placement in the world in this life East Meets West Values Systems East West Collectivist: group if valued above the individual,  Individualist perspectives: single person held  sharing and duty of each person above the group in terms of importance,  Do for the good of the community, promote harmony,  competition and personal achievement is  interdependence and collaboration, sharing emphasized Greater respect for the past, recognize the wisdom of  Look towards the future elderly View the world as a circle, constantly changing, search  Linear world, simpler more deterministic world,  for relationships between things, you can’t understand  focus on details not whole picture the part without understanding the whole Yin/yang in Taoism: represents circular, constantly  changing nature of the world, each  part exists because  Chapter 2 – Eastern and Western Perspectives  01/15/2014 of the other, ad neither could exist alone Goald of balance: trusting in the fact that although  Find a goal, and do everything to achieve it =  unhappiness occurs, it would be equally balanced by  happiness happiness Constructs of compassion and harmony are values Construct of hope is valued Different Ways to Positive Outcomes Individualist and construct of hope ­ Hope: belief in a positive future, highly interwoven into Western thinking ­ Founded in Judeo­Christian belief: hope was seen as way to improve life on earth during Middle Ages ­ Age of Enlightenment: conducive to exploration and change ­ Industrial Revolution as a result of this hope ­ Personal and individual goals exemplified by hop seem to be primary tool toward the good life Eastern Values Compassion ­ Western: Aristotle wrote on concept ­ Confucian:Jen (humanity) encapsulated all other virtues ­ Taoist: humanity must occur naturally ­ Buddhism: path towards transcendence through compassion ­ Hindu: good actions towards others ­ Requirement: • The difficulties of recipient must be serious • Recipients difficulties cannot be self inflicted • As observers, we must be able to identify with recipients suffering Chapter 2 – Eastern and Western Perspectives  01/15/2014 ­ Compassion= unilateral motion that is directed outward from oneself, focus on others rather than  ourselves ­ Capacity to feel and to do for others are central to achieving the good life ­ Feeling for others promotes cohesion of group ­ Comes more naturally to someone from collectivist culture rather than individualistic ­ Needed to transcend and move toward the good life, compassion asks people to think outside  themselves too connect with others Harmony ­ Satisfactions of a plain country life, shared within a harmonious social network ­ Getting along with others allows person to be freed from individual pursuits and gain collective agency  in working out what is good for the group ­ Cannot be confused with conformity Chapter 4 – Developing Strengths and Living Well in A Cultural Context 01/15/2014 David Satcher on Culture in Psychology ­ Culture: common heritage or set of beliefs, normal and values, refer to shared attributes of one group  (race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, religion, disability and nation of  origin) ­ Show if people seek help in first place, what types of help they seek, what coping styles and social  supports they have, how much stigma they attach to mental illness ­ Feature strengths: resilience and adaptive ways of coping ­ Culture of clinician and larger health care system govern societal response to a patient • Delivery of care (diagnosis, treatment and organization/reimbursement of services) ­ Today: we have a bias to delivering psychological treatment ­ Moral: count culture as a major influence on the development and manifestation of  human strengths and good living Understanding Culture: A Matter of Perspective ­ Psychology has 2 views:  1. genetically deficient and culturally deficient perspectives on handling diversity • biological differences explained perceived gaps in intellectual capabilities between racial  groups • could not benefit from growth opportunities and did not contribute to advancement of society • pseudoscience used to demonstrate the presumed genetic basis of intelligence in one race vs  another (ie skull shape) • eugenics:  selective breeding 2. culturally different perspective recognizes potential of each culture to engender unique strengths • related intellectual tendencies of certain races with their lack of resources, limited exposure to  prevailing values and customs of the day • culturally pluralistic: uniqueness and strengths of all cultures were recognized • culturally relativistic: interpreting behaviours within the context of culture) Chapter 4 – Developing Strengths and Living Well in A Cultural Context 01/15/2014 Positive Psychology: Culture Free of Culturally Embedded? ­ Educational specialties and theoretical orientations to counselling influence psychologist efforts to help  people function more optimally ­ 3 issues: 1) effects of professionals cultural values on research and practices, 2) universality of human  strengths, 3) universality of the pursuit of happiness Culture free positive psychology research and practice ­ Positive social science is descriptive and objective and results can “transcend particular cu
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3BA3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit