Study Guides (248,297)
Canada (121,466)
Psychology (970)
Final

ExamTextbookNotes.pdf

5 Pages
204 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3CB3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Winter

Description
Exam Textbook Notes    Chapter 7 (149­150)    Experiment    In one experiment, subjects argued in favor of using condoms every time one has sexual  intercourse. In the experimental condition, subjects were reminded of their failures to wear  condoms. In the control condition, subjects were either reminded of their failures without  arguing in favor or argued in favor without being reminded of their failures. The subjects in  the experimental condition purchased more condoms after the experiment than the control  group. * (likely to be tested, only experiment in the chapter)    Chapter 8    Principle 1: Our attitudes are often influenced by weak and irrelevant information.     Principle 2: Weak/irrelevant information effects are reduced when we are motivated and  have an ability to form correct attitudes, except when the relevant information is hard to  detect.    Experiment (* likely to be tested)    In this study, subjects were given an article outlining the link between women coffee  drinkers and fibrocystic disease. Female drinkers of coffee were placed in one condition  (high relevance) and the females who did not drink coffee in another (low relevance). The  subjects who were coffee drinkers were further divided into two groups, one of which was  given the opportunity to self­affirm and another group which had no such opportunity. The  results showed of the coffee drinkers, those who did not self­affirm were more defensive  and less likely to change their views. Furthermore, coffee drinkers who self­affirmed were  more accepting of the article and more likely to reduce their coffee drinking habits.     (The logic here is that the message that drinking coffee is linked to a disease is a  message that is a threat to those who already drink coffee and individuals will be defensive  in response to a threatening or counterattitudinal message unless they can affirm their own  values, in which case being true to their core values can evaluate the message without  being defensive. In all, self­affirming increases systemic processing)    Principle 3: Changing one’s attitudes depends on addressing the properties (content,  structure, function) of the original attitude     Experiment    In one study, subjects were given positive information about either the content of a new  drink (nutritional value) or affective information (tastes great). They were then given either  negative content or affective information. The results showed that when the initial attitude  was formed based on content, that a negative content appeal elicited more change and the  same was true for affective information (Matching effect).    Research    Individual differences exist. Individuals who primarily build attitudes on affective information  are more affected by affective information and individuals who primarily build attitudes  based on cognition are more affected by cognitive information.    Individuals who are high­self monitors are more influenced by appeals with social concerns  and low self­monitors are more influenced by appeals with value­expressive functions.     In one experiment, subjects were given objects that served either an instrumental function  (cup) or a social­adjustive function (thank you card). The results showed that subjects were  more likely to change their attitudes about an object with an instrumental function when  instrumental information was presented and the same was shown for social­adjustive  objects.    In another experiment, subjects who were either sad or angry read an appeal to increase  state tax. When this appeal was linked with sadness, the sad individuals were more  influenced/persuaded than the angry individuals. Furthermore, when this appeal was linked  to anger, the angry subjects were more persuaded than the sad subjects. This was only  true in those high in need for cognition. This supports the idea of function matching.     Principle 4: Our attitudes can be changed from things beyond our awareness.    Merely comprehending a false statement is enough to persuade us of its truth.    Value­account model: dual process model, explicit processing averages out new  information with old information whereas implicit processing adds new information to the  value account memory storage.    One experiment had subjects watch television while reading out stock prices. The results  showed that subjects had attitudes towards the stocks that matched their actual value,  despite not being aware that this was the case.    Subjects in another experiment were either thirsty or not. Both conditions were primed with  either thirsty or neutral words. The thirsty subjects primed with thirsty words, drank  significantly more water than any other group, suggesting that implicit primes can affect our  behaviors.    In another experiment, subjects were presented s
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3CB3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit