Study Guides (248,283)
Canada (121,453)
Psychology (970)
Final

sentence comprehension.docx

8 Pages
51 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3UU3
Professor
Karin R Humphreys
Semester
Winter

Description
February 26 , 2014 Psych 3UU3: Psychology of Language Sentence Comprehension Sentence Comprehension ­ Beyond individual words, how to understand whole sentences? ­ More research has been done on reading, since it’s easier • Assume reading comprehension can be generalized to spoken language  recognition ­ What do you need to understand a sentence? • Prosody • Syntax/grammar  What the structure of the sentence is, what role each word plays,  how word relate to each other (incremental process, we don’t wait  until the end of the sentence, we make decisions as soon as we  know) ­ Why do we want to know how this works? • Ambiguity of words (knowing if it’s a verb or noun)  Knowing about ambiguity is important in teaching a language to  foreigner  Teaching children in a non­ambiguous way  Law issues: where to place the comma, what are the possible  meanings?  Problems associated with brain damage  Getting computers to understanding language ­ Question of PARSING ­ How can we figure out how people parse sentences ­ How can we make computers parse sentences ­ Do these problems need to be solved in the same way ­ Thematic roles: meaning ­ Syntactic roles: syntax ­ Example: • The girl chased the cat  Thematic roles: agent vs. patient  Syntactic roles: subject vs. object  Back in elementary and high school, we were taught that the  subject of a sentence is the do­er or agent, but this definition of a  subject is actually incorrect. The subject does not play a thematic  role, it only takes on the first position of a sentence • The cat was chased by the girl  The subject is the cat, even though it is the patient, which sis the  thing being done to (the subject only takes a position, it doesn’t  have to have a thematic role. It just has to be first thing in a  sentence) ­ More thematic roles: agent, patient, recipient, location, source, goal, theme, time,  instrument ­ So – what do you have to figure out? Verb Argument Structure ­ Verbs come out, an important question we have to ask is what theya re doing:  their thematic role in syntactic role ­ Tricky as verbs do different things (*asterisk means ungrammatical) • The girl slept (intransitive) • * The girl slept the bed (unframmatical) • The girl  chased the cat (transitive?) • ? The girl chased (is it grammatical…not sure)(when listening to  sentences, we have to predict the future. As the words come in you have to  guess what willcome up as fast as you can, speed parsing is necessary) • The girl gave the book to the boy (to the: preposition) • The girl gave the boy the book (double object) • * The girl gave the boy (needs the oteher argyme: gave the boy WHAT) • ? The girl gave the book (is this grammatical? Not sure) • The girl donated the book to the bou • * The firl donated the boy the book (donate likes to take on a preposition) • The girl thought the boy was cute (a whole sentence as the argument) • * The girl chased the boy was cute ­ Sentential complement ­ How do we decide how to parse (important question for knowing the models  mentioned) • Semantic information • Syntactic informaiton Sentence Comprehension ­ Major argument: one step or two step model? Two Step Model ­ Traditional model ­ Purely syntax first, then use semantics ­ AUTONOMOUS model: syntax and semantic work separately, can’t help each  other ­ Serial model One Step Model ­ Syntax, semantics, other information all together ­ INTERACTIVE model ­ What other kings of information would be useful? • Context • Pragmatics: what is this person trying to get across to me? How is the  language is usually used? • Frequency: does this word usually take this argument structure? “Lay your  bet” on a more common argument Ambiguous Sentences ­ The cop saw the man with the binoculars • Who has the binoculars (see parsing on tree slide) • Globally ambiguous ­ Compare: • The cop chased the man with the binoculars OR • The cop saw the car with the binoculars • Strong semantic context constraints the interpretation, supports interactive  nature • They are still ambiguous, but the semantics suggest one way or the other  supports the interactive, one step model? Autonomous Vs. Interactive (One Step vs. Two Step) ­ Autonomous: serial vs. parallel ­ Interactive: serial vs. parallel ­ Different kinds of autonomous models – serial vs. parallel ­ Also, serial vs. parallel interactive models ­ Advantage of parallel processing: FASTER ­ When is what information used Autonomous Models ­ Serial: syntax first, choose one parse. If it doesn’t end up making sense (using  semantics), go back and create another parse, see if that one makes sense ­ Parallel: construct all possible syntactic interpretations in parallel, choose best one  using semantics Interactive Models ­ Serial: sue semantic info to guide syntactic decision and arrive at a single parse. If  it ends up not making sense, go back and try again (repair) ­ Parallel: generate all possible parses, bearing in mind the semantic plausibility of  each one Serial (one candidate at a  Parallel (multiple candidates at  time) once) Autonomous (syntax  ­ syntax first, choose one  ­ construct all possible syntactic  process first, then  parse interpretations in parallel, choose  semantics, no  best one using semantics “communication”  between the two) Interactive (semantic is  ­ use semantic info to guide  ­ generate all possible parses,  allowed to come in during  syntactic decisions and  bearing in mind the semantic  syntax stage) arrive at a single parse. plausibility of each one ­ if not making sense, go  back and revise Garden Path Sentences ­ The horse raced past the barn fell • Makes you parse incorrectly • Locally ambiguous sentence (as opposed to globally ambiguous sentence) • The horse which was raced past the barn, fell (the unambiguous version):  raced was treated as a past participle instead of a past instead verb like we  usually think, since we always like to think the horse actively race itself,  not getting raced by someone else ­ Compare: the presents placed (past participle) near the fire burned (same syntactic  structure as the horse sentence, but this one is much easier to parse and  understand ­ The old man the boat ­ John painted the wall with cracks ­ The crooked politician accepted [the money was gone forever] (sentential  complement) ­ Time flies ­ You cannot ­ They move too fast ­ Cheney hunts quail ­ Companions fuck ­ Man waxes poetic, truck (compare man saves wife, son) Bonus Word of the Day ­ Zeugma: figures of speech in which one single phrase or word joins different  parts of a sentence ­ E.g. are you getting fit or having one? The beer needs to be drunk and so do we. March 5 , 2014 Two Step Model ­ Purely syntax first, then use semantics ­ Autonomous model One Step model ­ Syntax, semantics, other information all together ­ INTERACTIVE model Garden Path Sentences ­ The horse raced past the barn fell ­ The horse which was raced pas the b
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3UU3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit